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December 13, 2002 - Image 72

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CAMP from page 68

Spirited Summer

Rina Bergman, daughter of Ruth and Rabbi
Aaron Bergman, found her way to Hadassah's
Young Judea camp by way of the Young Judea
youth group she had joined. "I love it!" the Hillel
sixth-grader says of her three summers at camp.
"There's a lot of mach [spirit], the counselors are
ready to help out and I have great friends. They
make Judaism fun, too."
That Young Judea was simmer Shabbat [Sabbath
observant], provided kosher food and was Zionist
in its philosophy were important factors for Rinds
parents, but as her father explained, Young Judea
offered more than that, too.
"I like the fact that people look out for each
other there," he says. "The older campers look
out for the younger ones and the younger ones
understand the privileges and responsibilities that
come with being a _ n older camper. It creates a real
communal feel. "
Not everyone goes to camp as a grade-schooler,
but that doesn't mean a connection to camp can-
not be formed. David Morley's family moved
from Birmingham to Lansing some years ago and

he now attends the University of Michigan. The
summer before his senior year of high school, he
attended the Reform movement's North American
Leadership Academy in Warwick, N.Y.
"My mother told me I had two choices: get a.
job or go to a Jewish camp," Morley recalls.
"Then one of my mom's good friends, who
attended the camp as a teenager, convinced me it
would be a great summer. My synagogue gave me
a scholarship and it was a done deal.
"When I first got there, I was intimidated
because I didn't know anyone. But I looked at is
as an experiment, a rehearsal for college. 'Can I
make friends?' Once I started meeting kids, I
loved it. By the end, I knew everyone there. It
was one big community.
"I was in the social action track. We studied
hunger and homelessness in America and learned
not only how the political system works but how
to help as a Jewish teenager."
Morley returned to the camp last summer to
work as a lifeguard and will do the same this
summer. Still blond from his days in the lifeguard
chair, he jests, "It's the best job you can have. You

-

sit outside all day and get paid for it."
But on a more serious note, this college fresh-
man takes stock of his summer in Warwick.
"There was every type of person there — kids
from the worst parts of Brooklyn to the richest
kids from L.A. Camp changed my life in that I
have built friendships forever. I have a network of
friends all over the country."
Camp can transform a youth like no other
experience. Shrinking violets blossom; youngsters
with few links to Judaism establish lifelong con-
nections; hidden talents emerge. And sometimes,
a camp experience even sets one's life course.
Jamie Royal recently decided to switch from
business to pre-medicine. Home for
Thanksgiving, the petite former Blue Star
camper-turned-counselor says, "Kids grow from
their relationships with their counselors as much
as they do from their friendships. I used to look
up to my counselors and, these past two sum-
mers, I saw the way they looked up to me. I want
to be around kids forever — be a role model,
interact with them in a way that helps them." ❑

"Grins" are "In" at

APAT SHALOM PAY CAMP

Don't miss out on a great summer adventure!



Temple Israel Early Childhood Center

e

Sommer Fun - Jane 16th thru Aogost ls

2 YEARS — KINDERGARTEN BOUND

Be part of our creative, enthusiastic, caring, fun-loving Camp

Session I: June 16 - July 11

(for kids 3-5 years old)

Session II: July 14 - August 1

Join us each Monday, Wednesday and Friday as we...

Adat Shalom's warm, experienced staff

0 RAISE OUR CAMP SHEMESH FLAG
0 CREATE EXCITING NATURE CRAFTS
0 EXPERIENCE THE FUN OF COOKING
0 FROLIC IN THE WATER
a EXPERIMENT WITH SCIENCE
0 EXPLORE THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF STORYTELLING
0 DANCE & SING WITH OUR TALENTED STAFF
0 PARTICIPATE IN OUTDOOR GAMES & SPORTS

2 Morning Program
3 Morning Programs with Supervised Lunch
3 Full-day Programs with complimentary lunches on Wednesday
Weekly Themes • Water Flay with Wading Fools
Nature • Crafts & Cooking • Outdoor Adventures

"Special Visitors": puppeteers,
musicians, naturalists and story tellers

Full-day campers will be treated every afternoon to
specialists in music, sports, Hebrew or science
who will provide a variety of challenging activities

12/13

2002

70

e

The following summer programs
will also be offered at
Temple Israel Early Childhood Center
Monday thru Friday:

Also: Parent-Toddler and 'Just For Me"

"Movin' On Up" (2'/2-3 years)
"Parent/Toddler" (18-30 months)
"Baby Bunch" (12-18 months)

For applications,
call Eileen Weiner, Camp Director
245-851-5105

678890

679090

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