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November 08, 2002 - Image 135

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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aboard to treat your symptoms early, Dr.
Goldberg advises,

Would you have thought that simply
owning a car may be one of the biggest
risk factors for heart disease? Dr.
Goldberg, a New Yorker, said she walks
Preventive Program
everywhere she needs to go.
Her book also offers a 150-page section
Jewish women who keep holiday tra-
providing details of the
ditions should be careful
Women's Healthy Heart
when preparing holiday
WOMEN ARE
Prevention Program. "The
according to Dr.
NOT SMALL MEl meals,
philosophy is to treat the
Goldberg. Traditional foods
LIFE-SAVING STRATEGIES FOR
whole person," and Dr.
often require deep-frying.
PRFANTING AND HEALING
Goldberg designed it to
But, women can cook foods
' HEART DISEASE
include individualized
differently to make sure they
IN WOMEN
exercise and nutrition pro-
honor traditions in a heart-
grams, social support,
healthy way.-
group and individual
She bakes rather than fries
counseling, stress manage-
her Chanukah latices. On a
ment and yoga classes.
well-greased pan in a very
"It's about lifestyle, diet
hot oven, she finds they
NIECA (rou)Brito. M.D.
and exercise," Dr.
even turn a delectable shade
Goldberg said. "Women
of brown. It took a little
often put others before themselves. This
trial and error, Dr. Goldberg admitted,
program teaches them to take time to
but even her father likes them now.
take care of themselves."
Whoever you are, you will learn
Nieca Goldberg, M.D., speaks
something from this book:
10:30 a.m. Friday, Nov. 15, at
Were you aware that smoking triples
the Jewish Community Center
your risk of heart attack? Did you know
smoking could lead to early menopause?
in West Bloomfield.
Or that of all fruits, blueberries have the
most heart disease-fighting antioxidants?

RING TRUNK SHOWS 2Q 0

November 14th Thursday
November 15th Friday
November 1 6th Saturday

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November 21st Thursday
November 22nd Friday
November 23rd Saturday



including a tracing of breast cancer
treatments and their emotional impact
on women from 1944, when "no one
knew anyone with breast cancer," to
the present day, when support groups
and knowledge abound.
Perhaps most revealing is the portrait
of Reibstein's confusing and, at times,
turbulent relationship with mother
Regina.. "I resented her criticism; it felt
like an infringement of wha I was ... at
the same time ... I admired and wanted
to be like her."
One of the book's few flaws is a 25-
page section of a verbatim transcript of
mother Regina's diary from her last few
years. Even though it is sometimes
powerful, the long section ends up
mostly just diverting the reader from
the main story.
Writing this memoir was "deeply
therapeutic" for Reibstein and allowed
her to make a coherent story of her
relationship with her mother. Another
reason for the memoir was to explain
her cancer rationale.
When prophylactic mastectomy was
just a seed of an idea, Reibstein confid-
ed in a doctor friend. Her friend's reac-
tion shocked her. The friend claimed
that prophylactic mastectomies were
part of a "male conspiracy"
Fearful that others would not under-

stand, Reibstein decided not to share
her decision with anyone but the few
most close to her. In her memoir, we
come to understand her thought
process clearly and in the broader con-
text of her family history
"I knew if I got the diagnosis, it
would carry with it that I would die
and have to go through terrible treat-
ments, that I'd lose myself to cancer,
even while I was living," Reibstein
explains. "I couldn't do that to my
kids."
A few years after her mastectomy,
when genetic testing became available,
Reibstein found out that she did have a
genetic mutation (of uncertain signifi-
cance).
Two genes show certain mutations,
which are associated with a high risk of
breast cancer. These mutations are
more common in Ashkenazi Jews
(about 1 in 50 have one) compared to
the general population (about 1 in 800
have one). ❑

Janet Reibstein speaks 11 a.m.
Sunday, Nov. 17, at the Jewish
Community Center in West
Bloomfield.

GARFIELD&MARKS

December 5th Thursday
December bth Friday
December 7th Saturday

LENDAR



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11/8

2002

103

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