100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

October 04, 2002 - Image 109

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

nil1111111114 AV

Europe one regularly hears a wide vari-
ety of ethnic music "and we never called
it 'world music' — we just called it
music.'"
Her own music could be classified as
folk, she says. Joan Baez, Pete Seeger
and the Weavers first influenced her in
the 1960s, when, accompanying herself
on guitar, she moved beyond tradition-
al romantic Hebrew songs and began
singing about the struggles of real life.
But during her long career as a top
album seller in Israel with almost 50
recordings since the late '60s, many of
them now gold or platinum, she has
sung just about everything — from
folk- to rock to pop, Israeli and foreign,
even children's songs. Along the way,
she's earned comparisons to Baez and
Edith Piaf and Judy Collins as - well.
Alberstein believes the term "world
music" was "born in the United States
because everything' that is not
American is 'world music.'
'But to me, Frank Sinatra and Elvis
Presley is 'world music,'" she says, light-
ly tweaking our American-centrism.
"Every good music is 'world music.'
That is the magic of songs. Even if
you don't understand the words, you
can relate to it. You can even create
your own words sometimes."
Whatever one calls it, the "world
music" genre has created a new market
andd - a new respect for other cultures.
And that is positive, she says.
"I like it because it brings a lot of
people who maybe didn't hear the
music before, because now there are
`world music festivals' and Americans
are much more open to it."
She notes that instead of just per-
forming for the Jewish community in
America, she now is being asked to
perform at art centers.
"Ten and 15 years ago you didn't see
African groups and. European groups
performing in art centers. It is good,"
she says.

Yiddish Booster .

Alberstein always has had a love of
Yiddish. She is increasingly recording
in the language, including last year's
collaboration, The Well, with the
Klezmatics, and the recently released
Foreign Letters, a Rounders re-release
of an album originally on a French
label that includes six Yiddish songs.
"I'm a freak of Yiddish literature and
Yiddish poetry for many, many years; I
have a big library. I still can't figure
out why it happened," she says.
While she has sung Yiddish songs
throughout her career, or put Yiddish
writings to her own music, she now

15% OFF
TOTAL BILL

with coupon.
Expires 10/31/02

--
Visit the Thai Restaurant thai blends
B l ights.
atmospheric elegance with CU 1

1

Featuring the bubble Drink afe

30923 Woodward Ave. • Koyal Oak, Ml +8073

(2+8) 28 8-0002

-

Open: Mon — Thur. 1 1 am -1 Olom • Fri. 1 1 am- 1 1 pm
Sat. 1 2pm-1 1 pm • Sun. 12-1 Opm
Lunch served 'HI 3pm Mon-$r i

1 3 mile se Woodward in The Northwood Shopping Center

ONG H U4

FINE CHINESE DINING

Alberstein's recent releases include
"Foreign Letters," a Rounders
re-release of an album originally
on a French label that includes
six Yiddish songs, and last year's
collaboration with The Klezmatics,
"The Well."

writes some of her own songs in Yiddish.
"I have many more in my head," she
says. "I'm very happy, but it's some-
thing really crazy. I don't do it for ide-
alistic reasons, though there is some-
thing to keeping Yiddish alive and giv-
ing it some fresh feelings.
. It is an inspiration. When I see a
beautiful poem in Yiddish, the music
comes naturally."
And how does she characterize her
Oct. 10 performance?
"It's like a journey into Israeli and
Jewish history through music and sto-
ries," she says. "Some are very person-
al, some are very funny, some are
melancholy; it is an experience."
She adds, "It is also a chance to see
something from Israel that is not just
the tanks and the war and terrible
things that are part of this country, but
also another side that is part of this
country. The more spiritual side." ❑

Chava Alberstein performs 8
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, at Royal
Oak Theatre, 318 W. Fourth
Street, in Royal Oak. Doors at 7
p.m. Ages 21 and older. $35-
$60. (248) 544-7949.

ciimite,s, Tau, zo,

'A

wonderful adventure in fine dining" - Danny Raskin

Featuring Gourmet Oriental Cuisine

Excellent
Lunch
and
Dinner
Selections
7 Days
a Week
I I a.m.-
Midnight

Complete
Menu
Carryout


Gift
Certificates
Available


We Cater
To Private
Parties

27925 Orchard Lake Road, north of 12 Mile • Farmington Hills

248.489.2280

Wishing Our Customers A Happy & Healthy New Year!

We
Honor M
Restaurant
Coupons

(cannot
c ombine
c upons

• Baby Lamb Shish Kabob
• Lamb Chops Shish Kafta
• Shish Tawook
• Deboned Chicken • Potato Chop
• Chicken Cream Chop. White Fish
(American & Chaldean-Style)

Call us for all your catering needs

20%0FF

LUNCH OR DINNER ENTREE

middle-Eastern
Dining

DINE IN OR CARRYOUT

-„,„,„1 „

With Coupon

29222 Orchard Lake Road, S. of 13 Mile
Farmington Hills

(248) 855-1122

Fax (248) 865-6001
www.food.com/desertsands

7 DAYS A WEEK!

Ex•ires 10 31 02

20% 0FF ALL CATERING!!

Parties of 20 people or more

LUNCH SPECIALS $4.9535.95 Daily
We Serve Cocktails & Wine

,

•\

10/4

2002

77

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan