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September 07, 2002 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SHABBAT/ The Sabbath
The weekly Shabbat observance begins at sun-
down each Friday evening with the lighting of can-
dles at home and a synagogue service called

Kabbalat Shabbat.
Friday night observances at home often include
a festive dinner that begins by reciting the
Kiddush, the prayer over wine, and HaMotzi, the
prayer over challa (egg bread). Saturday obser-
vances for Shabbat include services, a festive
luncheon and an afternoon of rest. A light third
meal, called seuda shilishit (pronounced "sooda
shillysheet"), also is traditional.
Shabbat concludes on Saturday night with the
Havdala (separation) ceremony. Spices, a special
braided candle and wine are used in this Sabbath
closing ceremony.

ROSH CHODESH/

First Day Of The New Month

Rosh Chodesh means "head of the month." It is
noted by reciting special prayers during the regular
Shabbat services, including Hallel, a series of
psalms.
Tradition tells us that because women did not
participate in the sin of the Golden Calf in the
wilderness, they were given Rosh Chodesh as a
gift. For this reason, women's study sessions and
prayer groups often meet on Rosh Chodesh.

ROSH HASHANAH/ Jewish New Year
Rosh HaShana (Tishrei 1-2) begins a 10-day peri-
od of repentance that lasts through Yom Kippur.
The shofar, usually a ram's horn, is blown dur-
ing services. Home observances include festive
meals with traditional foods, such as a round loaf
of challa and apples dipped in honey, symbolizing
wholeness and sweetness for the new year.
New Year's greeting cards often are sent to
friends and family. On the first day of Rosh

HaShana, it is traditional to drop breadcrumbs into
a river or pond as symbols of "casting away our
sins." This ceremony is called tashlich. Sept. 7,
2002

TZOM GEDALIAH/Fast of Gedaliah
This minor fast day (Tishrei 3) recalls the slaying of
Gedaliah, who the Babylonians appointed governor
of Judah after they captured Jerusalem in 586
B.C.E. He and his aides were killed by another
Jew, Ishmael Nethaniah, who sought disunity and
disruption. Some see this holiday as a paradigm
for the Jewish community today, when it is often
marked by strife and disunity within.

YOM KIPPUR/ Day Of Atonement
The most solemn day of the year (Tishrei 10), Yom
Kippur concludes the High Holy Days. Yom Kippur
is marked by fasting, prayer and teshuva (repen-
tance) as Jews reflect on their relationships with

THE DETROIT JEWISH HISTORIC TIMELINE

S

ome historical milestones in the
Detroit Jewish experience are
highlighted here. They represent
events and trends that had lasting
impact.
For more information, refer to "The
Jews of Detroit" by Robert Rockaway
and "Harmony & Dissonance: Voices
of Jewish Identity in Detroit, 1914-
1967" by Sidney Bolkosky. Both books
form the basis for this timeline with
additional help from Heidi Christein,
director of the Leonard N. Simons
Jewish Community Archives; the
Temple Beth El archives; Judith Levin
Cantor, past president of the Jewish
Historical Society of Michigan; and
David Gad-Harf and Allan Gale of the
Jewish Community Council of
Metropolitan Detroit.

1762: FIRST-
KNOWN JEWISH
SETTLER ARRIVES IN
DETROIT AND, OVER
THE DECADES, IS
FOLLOWED MOSTLY
BY GERMAN JEWISH
IMMIGRANTS.

— Suzanne Chessler

6 4 •

SOURCEBOOK 2002-2003 • JN

1850: BET EL SOCIETY, THE
FIRST JEWISH CONGREGATION
IN MICHIGAN, IS FORMED.

1850s AND 1860s:
JEWS BEGIN TO ESTABLISH
SIGNIFICANT BUSINESSES AND
ENTER CIVIC AND POLITICAL
OFFICES.

1880: DETROIT'S
JEWISH POPULATION
REACHES 1,000.

1881: INFLUX OF
EASTERN EUROPEAN
JEWS BEGINS.

1857: B'NAI B'RITH ORGANIZES
FIRST LOCAL CHAPTER.

1861: SHAAREY
ZEDEK SOCIETY IS
ESTABLISHED.

1869: DETROIT'S FIRST CENTRALIZED
PHILANTHROPIC AGENCY IS FORMED: THE
GENTLEMEN'S HEBREW RELIEF SOCIETY.

1889:
THE CENTRAL
CONFERENCE
OF AMERICAN
RABBIS IS
FOUNDED IN
DETROIT.

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