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August 30, 2002 - Image 107

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

• Days filled with laughter,
friends, caring

• A safe haven,
a professional staff

those com-
mandments
dealing direct-
1y with God
and those
with our fel-
low human
beings.
These trans-
gressions harm others as well as us,
and by extension, society as a whole
suffers, too.
Among the most difficult things
one can do is admit that he or she is
wrong and ask for forgiveness. That
is the beginning of the healing
process that we introduce with
Selichot.

• Respite for family
members and caregivers

• Therapeutic and
social activities

• Caregiver support
and education



• Health care monitoring

• Kosher meals
and snacks

• Personal care services
and transportation
available



Consider This

Questions to think about
as the holidays near.

Dorothy & Peter Brown
Jewish Community
Adult Day Care Program

• The Torah teaches us that
there are two kinds of sin: those
against God (such as violating
Shabbat) and those against man.
We cannot ask God's forgiveness
for our sins against other human
beings, but instead must go direct-
ly to those whom we have offend-
ed. Have you taken the time to
ask pardon from individuals you
know you have wronged?

• Reflect on your actions dur-
ing a disagreement. Do you
always insist you're right? Can you
see another's perspective? Who do
you think is the stronger person:
the one who asserts that he is
always right, or the one who is
willing to say, "I may be wrong"?
• Think carefully before you
make an apology. Sorry if you
were upset by what I said, but ...”
is not really an apology. It just
shifts blame back to the offended
person ("You were upset by what I
said? What's the matter with
you?"). A better way to say it is:
"I'm sorry I upset you."

• Consider how often you've
apologized to family members.
They're the people we love most,
but often treat with the least
respect.

• Are you really able to accept
another's sincere apology, or do
you tend to harbor a grudge? If
you answered yes, ask yourself why.

For older adults with memory disorders

Marvin and Carol Hilf — married 34 years. Marvin has
Parkinson's and some dementia associated with the
disease. He's been coming to the program for a year.

Th is is , E eJeration

:vs

of Met-cpo.rt Det.1

Realizing life's poienual

HOD EUERYTHIRG
FROM CflREERS
TO CMS in THE
CLflS

wiewishe)

r

ung

LuJ

JEWISH

110hCE

BASSONOVA

t

Suggested

retail

Available at the Comfort inn from the designer at s

160

A Healthy Happy New Year To All!,

EVERY SATURDAY
10 a.m. 4 p.m.
COMFORT INN • FARMINGTON HILLS
(12 Mile just East of Orchard Lake Rd.)

-

(248) 471-9220

Saturday Only

8/30

Mon-Fri call (586) 754-6360

'649400

2002

107

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