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August 02, 2002 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-08-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Arts & Entertainment

FREE OUTDOOR CONCERT;

24th Annual Yiddish
Concert in the Park

at Scotia Park in Huntington Woods

(on Scotia & Lincoln)

Rain Site: Huntington Woods Recreation Center, 26325 Scotia

Performance
Artist

Sunday, August 4, 7 p.m.

Combining elements of theater, music, art, science
and vaudeville, Blue Man Group co-founder Matt Goldman
offers audiences a unique multi-sensory experience.

Fun! Funny! Great for all ages!
The band dares you not to dance!

SUZANNE CHESSLER
Special to the Jewish News

More info? Call The Circle of Jewish Culture
248-545-0985 26341 Coolidge at Talbot

640200

rot

New to

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
10 AM-10 FiAi

27847 Orchard Lake Road

12 & Orchard Lake next to Roosevelts

Farmington Hills, MI
248.653.0002

I.

MIN NM

vwfi

MN MN

10 MILE & GRAND RIVER

248-476-5333

MON.-THURS. 5 - 10 PM • FRI. & SAT. 5-11 PM • SUN. 4-9
PM

8/ 2
2002

70

Founded By Friends

"This tour is unbelievably exciting for
Blue Man because it's completely new
ground," says Goldman, 40, whose
performers use plumbing pipe, imagi-
native hitting surfaces and reconstruct-
ed pianos among their many offbeat
instruments.
"There's almost no material that
we're performing in Michigan that
we've ever performed before. The
biggest departure is that a lot of the
songs actually have lyrics."
Blue Man Group, touring with an

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lue Man Group — a per-
formance act featuring
three men with blue-paint
ed heads, a unique style of
music played on invented instru-
ments and a variety of techno antics
— might seem to be from outer
space. But one of its founding mem-
bers actually traces his down-to-earth
roots to the Detroit Jewish commu-
nity.
Matt Goldman, born and raised in
New York City, is the son of Robert
Goldman, a Manhattan documentary
producer who graduated from
Detroit's Central
High School, became
active in the Hillel
program at the
University of
Michigan and gained
employment as the
first science editor of
the Detroit Free Press.
The younger
Goldman, a Clark
University business
graduate, builds on
the science interests
of his father while creating shows
constructed at the intersection of
human interaction and technology
with longtime friends and fellow per-
formers Chris Wink and Phil
Stanton.
Goldman's troupe soon will appear
in the area of his heritage as part of
the Area:2 — Summer Tour 2002 at
DTE Energy Music Theatre. Starting
at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6, the
concert features Blue Man Group,
Busta Rhymes, David Bowie, Moby
and the Irish band Ash on DTE's
main stage, with Carl Cox, John
Digwood, DJ Tiesto, the Avalanches,
DJ Tim Skinner and more perform-
ing in an air-conditioned dance tent.
The music festival, founded by
Moby last year, crosses musical gen-

res and seeks to bring together differ-
ent music fans.

BLUE MAN GROUP

Blue Man Groups
Grammy-nominated
CD, `Audio,"
features such tunes as
"Opening Mandelbrot,"
"Mandelgroove," and
"Klein Mandelbrot,"
and melds tribal,
surf and industrial
rock 'n' roll.

11-piece band this time, is stressing
music while sharing the stage with
other entertainers. In their more the-
atrical shows, Blue Man troupers dare
audiences to take part as members
explore the themes of urban isolation
and public disguises.
Their wider productions, consistent-
ly drawing standing ovations wherever
they are performed, are known for tak-
ing the audience through multi-senso-
ry experiences that combine theater,
music, art, science and vaudeville. For
example, tubes of paint are poured on
a drum, and the resulting splashes
form instant abstract art; or an audi-
ence member is dragged on stage to
join the Blue Men in a Twinkie ban-
quet, and watch the cream filling burst
out of their stomachs.

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