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July 26, 2002 - Image 76

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-07-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Entertainment

POISED FOR SUCCESS

from page 74

professional connections through them."
Nelson recently worked at Chicago's Field
Museum, where she printed exhibit photos. An
abstract photographer, she has taken series of photos
at specific locations and merged the images into one
picture.
"I've stayed five hours at a lake and combined pic-
tures from that place," Nelson says. "From a dis-
tance, each picture looks like one image."
Nelson, whose bat mitzvah took place at Temple
Beth El, credits her experiences while a student at
the Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills for the
intensity of her artistic interests.
"I like fiber and video because they're new and
often cutting edge," Nelson says. "I hope to work in
a paper mill because that involves a process that's
practical and useful, and I want to show my other
work in galleries.
"I like to recycle and have made paper out of my
old jeans and T-shirts. I've printed images from the
computer on my paper, and I've printed photos on
paper I've made."

• Jeffrey Glogower, who is fin-

ishing the graphic design pro-
gram at the University of
Michigan, doesn't plan to turn
his artistic interests into a
career — directly. Instead, he
plans to go on to law school
and specialize in copyrights.
"I've always been interested
in art and got into computer
design at West Bloomfield
High School," says Glogower, who has volunteered
his drawing skills to do posters for the Hillel pro-
gram at the university. "I like the technical and
problem-solving work in computer design."
Glogower, whose family has been affiliated with
Congregation Beth Ahm, also has done rush flyers
for his fraternity, Sigma Alpha Mu. He likes repre-
sentational work and is not interested in trying to
sell any of his personal projects.
"I hope to keep up my drawing to stay in practice
as an artist," he says.

• Jennifer Maiseloff is deter-
mined to have a career as a
professional artist. A graduate
of the College for Creative
Studies (CCS), she already has
a studio in Hamtramck, where
she paints on wood.
"I like the texture of wood,"
says Maiseloff, who has cap-
tured the essence of New York's
old synagogues as well as
Detroit's closed railroad station and abandoned
buildings. "My work is based on the history of
buildings. I want people to be reminded of what
happened in those places and understand how I felt
being there."
Maiseloff works at the Tangent Gallery in Detroit,
where she helps set up shows and takes on office
responsibilities. She credits the art-collecting inter-
ests of her grandfather, Micky Nemer, for launching
her attraction to architectural images.

7/26

2002

"I always loved painting," says Maiseloff, who
graduated from West Bloomfield High School and
celebrated her bat mitzvah at Congregation Shaarey
Zedek. "I want to get a master's degree in set design
because I also have a strong interest in theater."
Maiseloff's work has been part off student
exhibits at CCS. She also plans to show her proj-
ects during open houses at her studio.
"My plan is to design so that others can enjoy
my work as much as I do," Maiseloff says.

Tie Grapes of Wrath

• When Brooke Gerber was a
student at North Farmington
High School, she enjoyed
ceramics, but her art teacher
discouraged her from continu-
ing. Not one to give up on
artistry — or anything else —
Gerber tried her hand at jewel-
ry and was pleased to get a
thumb's up from the same
teacher.
Now a student at U-M, Gerber has taken on
large metal sculpture. She has done a bronze cast-
ing of a woman in a form that recalls ancient fertil-
ity statues, and she has used Hebrew lettering to
bring spirituality to her work.
"I chose to go to the University of Michigan
because I wanted a well-rounded education," says
Gerber, a member of Temple Israel who also want-
ed to enroll in Jewish studies. "I plan on becoming
an art teacher in the Teach for America program."
Gerber's work goal goes hand in hand with her
political interests. She has been active with Emily's
List, a political-action group for Democratic
women, and Voice Your Vote, a coalition that
encourages students to cast their ballots.
"I'm interested in exploring what it means to live
fully and grow," Gerber says.

Jeffrey Glogower: "Grapes of Wrath" book cover

Jennifer Maisel° • "Shalom"

• A trip to Israel guided Sean
Lasser into his personal artistic

explorations. As he started tak-
ing pictures to record his trav-
els, Lasser tried moving his
images in creative directions.
"I really enjoyed the photog-
raphy and decided to study
fine arts at Eastern Michigan
University," explains Lasser,
who has served in the Israeli
army. "I came back to America because I missed
my family and thought I would do better working
with English instead of Hebrew.
"As I took sculpture classes, I realized how much
I liked the process and seeing how far I could take
the materials. I've been in a few college exhibits. I
haven't done anything with Jewish subjects because
I want to do things that anyone can understand."
Lasser, who works for a heating and cooling
company in Ypsilanti, is applying to graduate
schools and hopes to become an art teacher in col-
lege.
"I still love traveling," says the West Bloomfield
High graduate, who celebrated his bar mitzvah at
Temple Israel. "I look for subjects that give per-
spective to simple, everyday living."

\



,

Brooke Gerber: "Untitled"



Sean Lasser: "Untitled"

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