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July 05, 2002 - Image 157

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-07-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

um_ro-11G-ETT41-D1.1

Private Charters perfect
for that special event.
We offer a variety of
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remember.

A Fish
Out Of Water

Catch 'ern and grill em for a hearty meal.

BY MELISSA CASTLEMAN

F

resh fish," says Bob Todd, a
onetime fishing-show host on
public radio, "is like grocery
store tomatoes versus home-grown
tomatoes. It's that different. Fresh fish
is that good."
Ask him about fishing and To
will sit you down and, after an hour
or two, begin to wax philosophical.
"The reason we all fish," he says, "is
becauseyou never know it all."
There's also that rich and yet deli-
cate fresh-fish taste. Once you've
experienced it, it's hard to go back
when you've sampled the real thing.
Like a ripe home-grown tomato, a
fresh-caught fish doesn't need much
in the way of preparation.
Oily fish such as salmon and trout
are perfect for grilling, poaching,
smoking and pan frying. They cook
up in a flash, though, especially the
smaller ones, which make the best
eating. The biggest task for the angler
is, after catching the fish, not to over-
cook the thing.
Ten minutes per inch-thickness is
the general rule when cooking fish.

But most seasoned fisherfolks just eye
it. "Once you start seeing the top side
get a little liquid on it," says expert
fisherman Scott Dukes of Colorado,
"you flip it. It takes just a few minutes
on each side."
Duke's salmon recipe calls for
lemon pepper, which he dusts on just
one side of the fish.

If you catch and keep

Quality fish come from quality
water. Seek out a clean body of water
if you plan to eat your catch. For
maximum freshness, keep your catch
alive as long as possible. When you
kill it, be careful not to bruise the
flesh. Keep the fish cold on crushed
ice, and drain the ice well. Clean the
fish thoroughly, removing the gills,
guts and kidney without puncturing
them. Innards don't taste good, and
they spoil quickly.
With larger fish, it's a good idea to
remove the bones, which impart a
fishy taste if left in during cooking.
Filleting a fish is like boning a chicken:
The goal is to work as closely as possible

A FISH OUT OF WATER on page 18

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