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May 17, 1996 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-05-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COLLEGE BOUND

When designing living quarters,
students contend with space
and a budget.

JENNIFER FINER SECTION EDITOR

I

PHO TOS BY DANIEL LI PPITT

College
Decorated

Above: Jason Zaks, Nate Sahn,
Ben Greenberg, Art Aisner and
• Albert Berger (pets included).

Right: Nate Sahn takes a few
practice swings in his college
home.

Cr)

UJ

Cr)

LU

O

CC

LU

70

Left: The breakfast nook
includes a spaghetti-jar
collection.

he guys living in this East Lansing house
are outnumbered by the number of ani-
mals by more than 2-1.
Two dogs, two snakes, a parrot, a bark-
ing tree frog, a hairless rat, two cats, two igua-
nas, Jason Zaks, Nate Sahn, Ben Greenberg,
Art Aisner and Albert Berger all called 411 Di-
vision their home during the 1995-96 school
year.
The architecture of the house is what's unique
— even more unuslial than its occupants. Wood
floors run throughout, matching the banister
on the stairs and trim near the ceiling. Deco-
rating was an easy task.
Some of the furniture in the home comple-
mented the 1929 architectural style of the 67-
year-old structure, though there was little of it
in the rooms downstairs. While a print couch
and various other items belong to their land-
lord, the guys each brought what they could
to "decorate" the house.
These Michigan State University students
claimed their favorite part of the house was the
breakfast nook in the kitchen Its gin ss-enclosed
cabinets revealed several empty jars of spaghet-
ti sauce lining the shelves.
'We've eaten a lot of spaghetti," they said.
A downstairs closet contained empty cans
and bowls filled with dog food.
The occupants pointed out some of the added
bonuses of living in a "prehistoric" home. Open-
ing a closed door recessed in the kitchen wall
revealed a pull-down ironing board. The guys
never used it but thought it was kind of cool.
Each human occupant was responsible for
decorating his own room and did so by bring-
ing furniture from home.
Despite the number of occupants who lived
in the house, everyone, animals included, got
along fine. ❑

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