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April 26, 1996 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NO POLES IT ROLLS

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THINK
spRiNG!

Waving A WAND

A national group lobbies Washington to change
priorities and helps put more women In office.

JULIE EDGAR STAFF WRITER

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read, not bombs," a staple
on bumpers, T-shirts and
kiosks during an un-
precedented military
buildup in the Reagan years,
sounds like a quaint slogan to-
day.
With the end of the Cold War,
bumpers carry new pithy say-
ings, T-shirts have faded, and
kiosks are pasted over with new
proclamations. The message has
been buried in the heap of other
political realities.
But that doesn't mean it has
lost its potency.
One organization has stayed
in the forefront of the disarma-
ment issue, although it has

programs being cut are pro-
grams that support women and
children — Head Start, Women
and Infant Care, Medicaid,
Medicare," says Arlene Victor,
WAND national president. "It
puts people on a downward spi-
ral. They have no way of getting
back on the train."
Congress has also chipped
away at educational programs
and those that provide housing,
job training and food stamps,
while a proposed House bal-
anced-budget plan would give
$73 billion more to the Pentagon
over the next six years. Accord-
ing to the Office of Management
and Budget, the plan would cut
education spending, for
example, by $44 billion.
At its ninth annual
Mother's Day Peace
Day Award Breakfast
on Thursday, May 9, at
the Community House
in Birmingham,
WAND will honor
women who are, either
as lawmakers or polit-
ical activists, promot-
ing programs that
benefit women and
children and fighting
those who would se-
verely cripple existing
programs.
State Rep. Maxine
Berman, D-Southfield;
Barbara Bonsignore,
Anne Broderick Zill: Founder of the Women's
Campaign Fund.
state president of the

changed its name and its mis-
sion, which, in its broadest sense,
is changing budget priorities in
Washington — from bombs to
bread. And it aims to alter the
face of Congress by helping more
women win elective office.
WAND, or Women's Action for
New Direction (formerly
Women's Action for Nuclear Dis-
armament), is keyed up for No-
vember's election, hoping to oust
lawmakers who are bent on loos-
ening environmental regula-
tions, dismantling social
programs and beefing up the
Pentagon's budget, which, last
year, reached $262 billion.
Every time Congress decides
to boost defense spending — a
new proposal would increase fed-
eral discretionary funds for the
military from 51 to 55 percent—
programs that support women
and children, veterans and the
elderly shrink, WAND says.
"Women and children are the
ones who suffer most from the
cuts on the domestic side. More
and more women and children
are falling into poverty and the

Arlene Victor: National president of
WAND.

Michigan American Association
of University Women; Debbie
Macon, national board member
of League of Women Voters of
the United States; and Jean

WAVING page 16

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