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April 12, 1996 - Image 75

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Barnes & Noble
in April.

BLOOMFIELD
HILLS
EVENTS

presents

"I think the fate of gay char-
acters in American literature,
plays and films is really the fate
of all characters who are sexual-
ly free — we must hang, we must
suffer. If you're a woman who
commits adultery, you're only
put out in the storm; if you're a
woman who has another woman,
then you better go hang yourself
It's a question of degree and, cer-
tainly, if you're gay, you have to
do real penance — DIE," Lau-
rents remarks on screen.
Of the 120 clips highlighted,
very few reference gay, Jewish
characters. In Ben-Hur (1959),
Charlton Heston plays the proud
Jew Ben-Hur, and Stephen Boyd
plays his boyhood friend Mes-
sala. In The Celluloid Closet,
screenwriter Gore Vidal recounts
how he put one over on the Pro-
duction Code censors by dis-
/—
creetly adding some romantic
tension between Heston and
Boyd.
"(In the movies), I've never
been aware of a specifically gay,
Jewish stereotype — except,
maybe, Harvey Fierstein's sissy
roles where he combined Jewish
qualities with gay qualities
(Torch Song Trilogy)," says
Friedman, 44.
"I see a lot of parallels between
how any group that's not the ma-
jority is portrayed in the movies.
For Jews, for blacks, for gays —
either you're not there at all, or
you're there in a kind of short-
> hand — which translates to a
stereotype," adds the filmmaker
who, along with Epstein, pro-
duced, directed and wrote the
1989 Academy Award-winning
documentary Common Threads:
Stories From The Quilt, a film
about the first decade of AIDS in
the United States and the peo-
> pie affected by it — including
Vito Russo.
"(Rob Epstein) and I have de-
veloped a way of working to-
gether. This is our third
nonfiction documentary feature.
We came to the collaboration
with different strengths, and we
try to play to those strengths,"
says Friedman, who admits that
while Epstein had more of a tra-
ditional Jewish upbringing than
he did, lie still identifies with Ju-
daism and the culture.
'We're gay. We're men. We're
Jewish. We're American. All of
those things inform the work
that we do to a greater or lesser
degree."

iJ

THE SEYMOUR J. & ETHEL S. FRANK

Festival of New Plays

College Planning
and Strategies

(IN STAGED READINGS)

Become a part of the theatre process and voice
your opinions to the playwrights, directors and the
actors . . . and hear theirs.

Wednesday, April 17 • 7:30 PM

High school seniors and their parents
will enjoy this evening's presentation
by Sheryl Krasnow who will present
valuable tips and resources for col-
lege applicants. All are welcome, no
reservation required.

ONE OF THE FEW

by Pat Lin

* Wednesday, April 17 — 7:30 p.m.
** Thursday, April 18 — 7:30 p.m.

Poetry Reading
with Teresa Tan

THE NIGHT THE WAR
CAME HOME

-

Friday, April 26 • 8:00 PM

By Hindi Brooks

In celebration of National Poetry
Month, Barnes & Noble welcomes
vibrational poet Teresa Tan.
Blending science and spirit, Teresa
will read selections from her recent
work as well as poems from her
award-winning collection, Intangible.

* Wednesday, April 24 — 7:30 p.m.
** Thursday, April 25 — 7:30 p.m.

703 WALK HILL

by Janet Neipris

* Wednesday, May 1 — 7:30 p.m.
** Thursday, May 2 — 7:30 p.m.

Story Time with
The Michigan
Classic Ballet

TO BE ANNOUNCED

* Wednesday, May 8 — 7:30 p.m.
** Thursday, May 9 — 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 27 • 11:00 AM

Suggested Donation $5.00

NO RESERVATIONS • JET (810) 788-2900

JET SUBSCRIBERS FREE

* *
THURSDAY PERFORMANCES

WEDNESDAY PERFORMANCES

Aaron DeRoy Theatre - J.C.C.
kflest Bloomfield

.

s-\

SIIEXR
MADNESS

Northville's
Historic

c7heati-e

Presents

- J.C.C.
Oak Park

AMERICA'S LONGEST-RUNNING
COMEDY WHODUNIT

EXTENDED!

Pinocchio

An enchanting story about a
wooden puppet who comes to life.

This afternoon, join us for an extra
exciting story time. Children aged 3
and up can look forward to stories
about ballet and a special live
appearance and dance hosted by
Angelina Ballerina. Kids will love this
special recital provided by the exper-
tise of the Michigan Classic Ballet

WEST
BLOOMFIELD
EVENTS

Self-Defense with
Sanford Strong

Wednesday, April 17 • 7:30 PM

Meet self-defense expert Sanford
Strong when he visits our store to
sign his new book Strong on
Defense. Mr. Strong will offer a brief
question and answer session as well
- as a demonstration of his own
self-defense techniques.

Open Mike Night
Poetry Reading

Friday, April 19 • 8:30 PM

Poets from all around are invited to
share the mike tonight in celebration
of the first official National Poetry
Month. We will have a sign-up sheet
available at 8:00 p.m. — the reading
will follow at 8:30. All ages are
welcome.

Children's
Bed Time Stories
with Teddy

Tuesday, April 30 • 7:00 PM

Kids of all ages! You'll love this spe-
cial "bed time with teddy" story hour.
Bring your favorite stuffed animal
and come ready for bed — in
pajamas, bathrobe and slippers —
and we will read bed time stories
about teddy bears and other favorite
bed time pals.

Bloomfield Hills fog

West Bloomfield <51,i, Q

6575 Telegraph Road
at Maple Road
(810) 540-4209
Open Mon-Sat 9 AM-11 PM

6800 Orchard Lake Road
south of Maple Road
(810) 626-6804
Open Mon-Sat 9 AM-11 PM
Sun 9 AM-8 PM

Sun 9 AM-8 PM

' café k music department g multimedia

Barnes Noble

Booksellers

Since /873

NOW OPEN
eAP t

Saturdays, 230 pm
April 13, 20, 27

Sundays, 2:30 pm
Apri114, 21, 28

Of Auburn Hills



Et Jeffrey Friedman and Rob
Epstein's The Celluloid Closet
will run at 7 and 9:30 p.m.
tonight and tomorrow and at
4 and 7 p.m. Sunday, April 14,
at the Detroit Film Theatre.
Tickets are $5.50. DIA. 5200
,Th Woodward Ave., Detroit. (313)
833-2323.

Live an
stage.

SPECIALLY PRICED
SUNDAY EVENING
PERFORMANCES!

Group
Rates
Available

*reserved seating for 20 or more.
*We'll sing "Happy B'Day" - let us know at
the Box Office before the show.

Tickets at the door or phone in advance

(810)349-8110

135 Main II Northville CO:

GEM THEATRE

BOX OFFICE

(313)

ricer

f~ .asra,

963-9800 (810) 645-6666

GROUP DISCOUNTS CALL NICOLE

(313) 962 - 2913

Serving The Same Great Food
As Our Detroit Location Since 1939

a,

CC)

885 Opdyke Road

(Across from the Silverdome)

For Reservations: 373-4440

75

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