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March 01, 1996 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOOKING. FOR MAX SOSIN?1

.o...r,aw.z.me.aym.,xos.,oxarztowwms

effilv;4

Shovel Your Way
To Great Health

D.J. BRADLEY SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

D

He's living the great life at the fLE1SCEIMAN RESIDENCE!

Why don't you come and join Max for:

Three Kosher Meals Daily
Medication Assistance
Around The Clock Security
Health Clinic
Respite and Guest Rooms Available

Daily Shabbat and Holiday Services in our Synagogue
Daytime and Evening Activities
Transportation, Laundry, Housekeeping
Registered Nurse 8r Personal Care Assistance
Nosh Nook, Gift Shop, Beauty/Barber Shop

For More Information Please Contact:

KARI K PROVIZER, A.C.S.W.

ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR/DIRECTOR OF RESIDENT SERVICES
FLEISCHMAN RESIDENCE/BLUMBERG PLAZA
6710 W. MAPLE ROAD, WEST BLOOMFIEID, (810) 661-2999
(LOCATED ON THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CAMPUS)

fireplace

barbecue

(810) 855-0303

*FRE

STANDARD
INSTALLATION

ALL FIREPLACE

GLASS DOORS
FIREPLACE DOORS
FROM $89.99 a IC< )LUATNHD
N S TA LLED*s7,,ET A L D

30903 ORCHARD LAKE RD(in Hunter Square betwn 13 & 14 Mile by sale ends
TJ MAXX, AMAZING SAVINGS & THE GAP) Open Sunday 14 am -5 pm 3 /07196

Monday —Thursday 10 am-9 pm Friday 10 am-4 pm CLOSED SATURDAY PRIOR SALES

EXCLUDED

on't put away those
longjohns, woolen mittens
and boots. Spring may be
around the corner, but
there's still time for that last big
snowstorm — and coldest work-
out of the year.
Snow shoveling.
For many people, it's a dread-
ed chore that coincides with the
winter blues. Snow shoveling,
however, also can be an alterna-
tive to the gym.
On average, snow shovelers
burn more than 600 calories an
hour.
"Although no one snowfall is
alike in terms of weight and
depth; shoveling can be thera-
peutic for the body, as well as the
soul and spirit," says Dr. Robert
Radtke, a chiropractor in Birm-
ingham.
For a good, safe workout, the
American Heart Association sug-
gests that individuals measure
their pulse rates.
According to Dr. Alan Nourse's
Family Medical Guide, 180 to
200 beats per minute, or even
more during a period of vigorous
exercise, are not uncommon.
One rule of thumb applies.
Don't overdo it. Shoveling is hard
work for people of any age, size
and level of physical ability. Cer-
tain precautions must be kept in
mind before tackling the snow
drifts and frosty air.
Physicians suggest dressing
warmly and in layers to retain
body heat. Scarves should be
worn over the mouth and nose so
the cold air won't irritate breath-
ing passages. This is especially
helpful for people who suffer from
asthma.
Hats are important. Re-
searchers say about 20 percent
of body heat is lost through the
head — more with children who
have large heads relative to their
small body mass.
Dr. Radtke feels it's critical to
warm up the body's muscles
through a light exercise routine
before braving the elements.
"By stretching the body, it's al-
ready getting warmed up and
will have more flexibility," he
says.
Keith Davidow, a certified per-
sonal trainer based in Southfield,
offers this warm-up routine to
help prevent strained or pulled
muscles:
"Take a few minutes jogging
in place. This gets you breathing
and gets the body warmed up.
Then take another couple of
minutes doing some toe-touch-
es to stretch the legs. Twist the
torso to limber the lower-back re-

gion. Do some shoulder motions
to stretch the muscles in the
upper body.
"The important thing to re-
member is to hold each position
for 15 to 30 seconds. If you create
a bouncing or jerking motion as
you warm up a particular region
in your body, you're more likely
to cause an injury," he says.
After completing the five to 10-
minute routine, Mr. Davidow
suggests pushing the snow out of
the way before scooping up heap-
ing amounts in your shovel. This
action requires less energy and
is less stressful on the back and
arms.
Dr. Ratdke notes that a ma-
jority of injuries happen when
people bend at the waist, which
creates "hyper-flexion" or lower-
back strain. He points out the

Shoveling is hard
work — and makes
for a good workout.

proper way to shovel is through
the hips and knees.
Once the snow is removed,
both men suggest a short cool-
down routine, like a brief walk,
to steady the heart rate.
The American Heart Associ-
ation says people who smoke, are
overweight, older than 45, phys-
ically inactive, suffer from high
blood pressure, have heart prob-
lems or elevated cholesterol are
more susceptible to heart attack
or exhaustion during snow shov-
eling.
Typical symptoms of a heart
attack include: uncomfortable
pressure, fullness, squeezing or
pain in the chest lasting more
than a few minutes; pain spread-
ing to the shoulders, neck or
arms; light-headedness, fainting,
sweating, nausea or shortness of
breath.
"With any strenuous exercise,
if you're careful, you'll be fine,"
Mr. Davidow says. "But if people
don't like the idea of shoveling
snow, then they still have the
option of dragging out the snow
blower and revving that baby
up. "111

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