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February 23, 1996 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE 1996 VOLVO 960

0%
FINANCING

$1,500
CASH
BACK*

$399
LEASE

GET MORE
BANG, BANG, BANG, BANG
FOR YOUR BUCK.

$199 OVER
INVOICE

Capitol Hill Politics
And The Terrorism Bill

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Driver's
side impact
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Passenger's
side impact
air bag.

Passenger's
front air bag.

Driver's
front air bag.

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Because safety shouldn't be an option.

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uburban

THE VOLVO STORE

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1821 Maplelawn
TROY MOTOR MALL

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& acq. fee due at signing. 12,1.1 mil. per yr. w/ 150 excess charge. Lessee has option to purchase at lease end for a pre-
determined price. Tit pymts. equal $17.964. MSRP S34,850. Trade equity or cash down will lower pymt. accordingly. 0%
financing available for 24 mo. with 40% of MSRP down w/approved credit. tBased on availability for warranty service
work. See dealer for details. Programs good thru 2/29/96.

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uburban

TOYOT A

1921 MAPLELAWN
TROY MOTOR MALL

• 24 or 36 mo. closed-end lease w!approved credit, S495 acq fee. SO
acq. on Camry. 5425 dent. tax, title, plus refundable sec. deposit
rounded to next 525 increment, lessee resp. for excess wear 8 tear,
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chase at predetermined price at lease inception. To get M.: multiply
pymt x term. Subject to resale Sale expires 2129196.

The omnibus anti-terrorism bill,
introduced with great political
chest-thumping after the bomb-
ing of the federal building in Ok-
lahoma City last year but
stalemated by House Republi-
cans, may get a boost from elec-
tion year politics.
But it is not yet clear whether
that boost will take the stalled
legislation in a positive direction,
according to Jewish activists who
have played a major role in the
Capitol Hill fight.
The anniversary of that bomb-
ing on April 19, along with quick-
ening pace of congressional
campaigns, is producing renewed
pressure to pass something; the
bill, which passed the Senate last
summer, is now scheduled for ac-
tion on the House floor in early
March.
Republican leaders in the
House are now pushing the mea-
sure actively, after a slow and
ambivalent start.
But Jewish activists here wor-
ry that the burst of political pres-
sure could lead House members
to further de-fang the bill, or add
unrelated provisions.
Already, the House version
contains controversial limits on
the habeas corpus rights of
death-row inmates, an inclusion
that has made the bill problem-
atic for the American Jewish
Congress, which has supported
the drive for comprehensive anti-
terrorism legislation.
"The fact that this is a politi-
cal year means it's likely some
kind of bill will pass," said
Michael Lieberman, Washington
counsel for the Anti-Defamation
League, a group that has been
out front in the anti-terrorism
push. "The question is what will
be cut out of the bill to make it
more acceptable to some Repub-
licans."
ADL and other Jewish groups
plan to stand firmly behind the
core of the bill, including provi-
sions banning fundraising in this
country for groups associated
with terror abroad, tighter laws
for barring entry into the coun-
try for suspected terrorists and
expanded federal jurisdiction for
investigating terrorist groups.

The law was passed in 1990,
thanks to intensive efforts by the
ADL and other Jewish groups. It
requires the Department of Jus-
tice to collect information on
crimes based on racial, religious,
ethnic or sexual prejudice.
The effort to get local law en-
forcement agencies to particulate
fully has been an arduous one,
but the effort will ultin lately help
officials understand the causes
of hate crimes, and help it the
development of programs to pre-
vent them.
"We believe that this effort has
proven its usefulness and de-
serves a permanent mandate,"
wrote Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, R-
Utah, and Sen. Paul Simon, D-
M., in a "dear colleague" letter.
"While collecting such data will
not erase bigotry, it does provide
a valuable tool in the fight
against bias-motivated criminal
conduct."
The drive to make the hate
crimes law permanent is also dri-
ven by political concerns; a new,
conservative administration
could decide not to enforce some
of its provisions, including those
mandating the collection of in-
formation on crimes based on
sexual orientation.

K

N

C

Neo-Nazis
In Sweden

B'nai B'rith is going to bat for
Swedish Jews concerned that
their nation is becoming a refuge
for neo-nazis and other assorted
bigots.
Recently, a leading German
neo-Nazi purchased a huge cas-
tle near Mariestad; Jewish lead-
ers in Sweden expect that Jurgen
Rieger will turn the place into a
training camp for extremists, ac-
cording to Warren Eisenberg, di-
rector of B'nai B'rith's
International Council.
"Other countries in Europe
have tougher laws restricting ex-
tremists," he said. "'The open bor-
ders of the European Union,
along with the lenient Swedish
laws on free speech, mean that
Sweden could become a new par-
adise for neo-nazis."
In a letter to the Swedish am-
bassador to Washington, B'nai
B'rith also pointed to the City of
Stockholm's funding of a social
club for Nazis and skinheads —
The Anti-Defamation League is a facility that Mr. Eisenberg said
pressing Congress to officially re- "increases the sense of intimida-
new the Hate Crimes Statistic tion and threat that the Jewish
Act, which expired at the end of community and other minorities c'
1995, even though federal au- feel. It's a difficult issue because
thorities have indicated that they of Sweden's commitment to free
will continue the data collection speech. But it's also important
for the government to respond
process.

Drive To Renew
Hate Crimes Law

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