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February 09, 1996 - Image 80

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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'Twelfth Night'

f you have never seen Twelfth "play on ..." and Cimolino takes sexual alignments, true loves are
Night, the Attic Theatre's new him at his word, merging music directed to true lovers (and the
production is the one to see; if and love. A small band of musi- subtext of same gender love is
you have seen the play, then cians playing various instruments muted).
Complementing the lovespun
this production is one to see as wander through the action or play
plot,
Cimolino sets a quintet of
gently
offstage.
Some
of
the
mu-
well.
clowns loose. What a bunch they
The premier directorial outing sic is pop songs of the era.
The plot reflects Shakespeare's are. The bellicose Sir Toby Belch
for Antoni Cimolino of the Strat-
is played with great brio
ford Festival is a Twelfth Night love of mixed-up romances. Vi-
by Todd Hissong; An-
ola
and
her
brother
Sebast-
filled with glamour and the glow
THEATER
drew Aguecheek has
ian are
of youth speaking poet-
the
funniest hair this
shipwrecked
in
ry as if heeding Hamlet's
Ilyria and each falls in side of a static-cling commercial
advice to the trcupe of
love with the wrong per- and is truly funny as played by
actors: "Speak the
son — for a while. Then Larry J. Campbell.
speech I pray you, trip-
Susan Arnold's Maria is a mer-
they
recombine, redis-
pingly on the tongue."
cover their identities, ry mixture of Mistress Quickly
Set, casually, on some
and all's well. The and AbFab, and Mark
Italianate shore in an
era of jazz babies, this MICHAEL H. MARGOLIN lovers are "loverly." Rademacher's Malvolio deserves
Orsino is played im- our scorn and earns his laughter.
1920 s-costumed
SPEC! AL TO
peccably by Theo Pit- Fabian was amiably played by
Twelfth Night gives us
THE JEWI SH NEWS
siavas. Equally dark, Scott Screws.
crossed loves, erotic
Robert Grossman shows up
though fulsomely so,
loves, fierce loves, even slightly
here
as Feste and nearly steals
Olivia
is
played
by
Julie
Van
off-kilter loves. There is the gen-
tle piquancy in hearing antique Dusen. Wearing a black draped the show — in part because he
prose dressed in flappers' cloth- dress and long, long gloves dur- knows the value of Feste's im-
ing, comic turns with straw hats. ing the day goes beyond fashion pertinence and how to color a line
"If music be the food of love ..." statement; it is wonderfully fun- vocally like an opera singer. He
also sings and plays the guitar
says Orsino, at the very first, ny.
As Viola, who masquerades as with the various ensembles, com-
Cesario, a eunuch, posed some very lovely new mu-
and causes Olivia to sic and set some of the
be infatuated, Rox- Shakespeare text to music.
Francesca Callow, credited as
anne Wellington is
extraordinary; she costume coordinator, and Gary
has a brimful face. Decker, set and light design, have
You can read her succeeded admirably: Malvolio's
thoughts behind, horrid argyle socks and the little
around and be- forest on wheels set in motion for
tween her words. the famous letter scene are ex-
Her scenes with amples of humor and wit at work.
Van Dusen, who
As good as it is — and this was
has a voice like a a preview prior to the formal
chilled mango, are press opening — it will get bet-
delicious. The scene ter. One hopes Cimolino will see
in which Viola de- that in such a small setting, hy-
fends womanly love perbolic physical comedy can
to Orsino is as fresh overwhelm the audience and
as if it were a debate should be thinned a bit; that what
in the pages of the the Duke hoped, that music
would surfeit him, may tire an
New York Times.
The last lover to audience sooner.
But when all's said, neither the
establish a beach-
head is Sebastian; bleakness of Trapper's Alley nor
as Kristopher Wal- the coldness of a Detroit winter
by plays him him, could dim the bright happening
you gotta love him. on the Attic's new stage. We —
Olivia does, because fools, lovers and audiences — are
he looks like Viola, blessed.
Mark Rademacher, Susan Arnold and Julie Van Dusen
but is no eunuch.
star in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Nightat the Attic
tO 1.1*.
Theatre, Feb. 8 - March 3.
And by this shift in

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