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January 26, 1996 - Image 89

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Church makes Glicker recall that
he painted it in the 1930s when
he lived in a downtown flat, just
blocks from a rail car turnaround,
and within shouting distance of
the Boblo boat dock.
"Painting has always been
something that I've just had to
do," he said. "I remember when I
was young being influenced by
Renoir, the Impressionists, the
Expressionists and feeling like
that's where I belonged. I just had
to do it."
His early years in the Russian
immigrant community on Hast-
ings Street in Detroit left an in-
delible memory of community
and Jewish ritual. But the grind-
ing routine of keeping up his par-
ents' deli didn't hold his interest.
So, the young Glicker enrolled at
Wayne State and soon became
the first art student who was
earning credit both from the uni-
versity and the Detroit School of
Arts and Crafts, now known as
the Center for Creative Studies.
The practical need to "make a
living' pointed Glicker in the di-
rection of teaching. Until his re-
tirement, Glicker always found a
way to paint outside of his teach-
ing responsibilities.
Along the way, he taught art
to students in primary grades to
high school in the Detroit Public
Schools. He even incorporated the
primitive crayon scratch draw-
ings of young art students into his
repertoire. The faces bare a strik-
ing resemblance to Matisse's
primitivism.
These days, his teaching days
are over. Glicker refers to the
Sunday visit from novice painters
as a get-together rather than a
class. "I just paint the everyday,"
he said. "It's my emotion; it's my
composition. I'm only responsible
to myself"
One of Glicker's favorite paint-
ings is of a contemplative harle-
quin; it won the Founders Prize
in the 1939 Michigan Artists
Show.
"If you remove the makeup,
you'd see another person, two per-
sonalities," he said. "One belongs
to the private and the other is the
one put on for an audience. All of
us put on faces for other people."
But it takes an artist to trans-
late subtle facial features onto a
canvas that reveals the dual na-
ture of the human personality. It
takes, of course, an artist who's
well-preserved. ❑

ET "A Collection of Works by
Benjamin Glicker" will be exhib-
ited at the Janice Charach Ep-
stein Museum/Gallery through
Feb. 29. The exhibit runs in tan-
dem with Gail Rosenbloom Ka-
plan's "Realism in Clay" and
"Letters Dipped in Honey," an ex-
hibit of children's books. The
gallery is located inside the
Maple-Drake Jewish Commu-
nity Center. (810) 661-1000.

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THE JEWISH NEWS (810) 354-6060

89

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