100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 05, 1996 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Bathing Safety For The Entire Family.

More than 5,000 children are scalded by hot water in the tub each year, according to the National
Safe Kids Campaign, prompting manufacturers to respond with several engineering breakthroughs.
One innovation from Grohe is Grohmix, a thermostatic valve for showers and tubs that allows you to
preset the temperature anywhere between 60 and 110 degrees. A safety stop se _ t at 100 degrees pre-
vents children from accidentally scalding themselves.
The Grohmix also is- a pressure
balancing valve, which prevents
temperature shocks from sudden
pressure changes in cold or hot
water. Whether a toilet is flushed
or dishwasher turned on, your
shower is never interrupted.
Almost all 50 states now
require that these types of safety
valves by used in all new con-
struction.
For more information on these
and other quality plumbing
products, visit the areas newest
bath showroom or call Advance
Plumbing Supply Co. Walled
lake, (810) 669-7474.

GROHE

ADVANCE PLUMBING SUPPLY CO.

1977 W. Maple Road, Walled Lake (Between Haggerty & Decker Rds.)
(810) 669-7474

BUY OFFICE FURNITURE DIRECTLY
FROM THE MANUFACTURER
&SAVE MONEY!

QV ACURA C19
All NEW '96 2.5 & 3.2 IL
IN STOCK NOW!
GREAT LEASES!

ALL '95 INTEGRA
MODELS
At Clearance Prices!

BUY OR LEASE!

'96 INTEGRA MODELS
1.99% A.P.R. Financing
available. (24 Months).

'95 LEGEND
Starting at

$32,667.

plus doc, tax, lic. & title

*Prices reflect
solid colors

SHOWROOM HOURS:

Wed. - Fri. 10-6

IT'S ALL AT APPLEGATE .. .

TE

<

10

✓ Great Stores
.1 Great Fashions
'SI ✓ Great Service

m

We Enjoy Shopping With You!

Northwestern Highway • Between 12 8. 13 Mile Rds.
Southfield

"WHY SETTLE
FOR LESS
WHEN YOU
CAN AFFORD
TO DRIVE THE BEST!"

Call for details on
Leasing or Financing
the New Acura of your
choice

ACURA OF TROY

'YOUR PRECISION TEAM ACURA DEALER"

In the Troy Motor Mall

(810) 643-0900

Find It All In
The Jewish News
Classifieds
Call 354-5959

Prisons Try To Snuff
Lights Of Freedom

DAVID ZEMAN STAFF WRITER

erhaps fearing some in-
mates might burn the can-
dle at both ends, the
Michigan Department of
Corrections quietly enacted a ban
early last month on using real can-
dles during prison Chanukah ser-
vices.
But the candle ban sparked a
brushfire of protest from Jewish
inmate advocacy groups, leading
to a quick reversal only days be-
fore Chanukah began.
"It was a united effort by the
Jewish community, with all these
groups hitting the Department of
Corrections at once," crowed Rab-
bi Herschel Fireman of Oak Park,
a volunteer prison chaplain who
helped lead the protest.
The controversy, which smol-
dered and was then extinguished
within days, underscores the ten-
sion that sometimes arises be-
tween the right of prisoners to
freely practice religion and the in-
terest of corrections officials in
keeping prison grounds free of
weapons and contraband.
According to Rabbi Finman, the
dispute stemmed from the prac-
tice of some wardens in the state'
of severely restricting or even ban-
ning Chanukah celebrations.
As a result, Rabbi Finman and
other chaplains asked corrections
officials to enact a single,
statewide policy regarding
Chanukah services.
What they got was a memo-
randum, dated Dec. 7, allowing
Chanukah services but expressly
forbidding candles and open
flames. "The candles on the meno-
rah must be electric or battery
powered," the decree said. An ac-
companying letter cited "fire-safe-
ty regulations" as the reason.
"Having a bunch of prisoners
around open flames struck Deputy
Director (Dan) Bolden as pretty
dangerous," prison spokesperson
Gail Light explained.
But that angered a group of
Jewish prison advocacy groups
with ties to the Lubavitch move-
ment.
On Dec. 14, three days before
the start of Chanukah, a Florida-
based group known as the Aleph
Institute faxed a letter to prison
officials protesting the policy.
That same day, the Lubavitch
Foundation in Farmington Hills

p

,

faxed its own protests to Gov.
John Engler asking him to inter-
cede. The American Jewish Con-
gress and the American Jewish
Committee were also involved,
said Aleph Director Isaac
Jaroslawicz.
One day later, the candle ban
was repealed, at least for now.
Prison officials announced can-
dles could be used during
Chanukah, but only by rabbis or
other civilians leading the service.
"Candles must not be in the pos-
session of prisoners at any time,"
the decree said.
The turnabout was so swift,
G- 017. Engler did not have time to
intervene.
Rabbi Levi Shemtov, a volun-
teer prison chaplain who is with
the Lubavitch Foundation, said
the dispute is part of a broader ef-
fort by corrections officials to
clamp down on inmates' rights.
His colleague, Rabbi Yitzchak
Kagan, added that prisons in oth-
er states routinely allow "open
flame" candles during Chanukah.
Mr. Jaroslawicz, of the Aleph
Institute, said ignorance of Jew-
ish tradition was probably to
blame.
"In many prisons," he said,
"there are 500 white supremacists
on one side, 500 black Muslims on
the other, and five Jews caught in
the middle."
Ms. Light, of the Michigan cor-
rections department, said religious
disputes crop up fairly frequently.
In one facility in northern Michi-
gan, officials permitted a sweat
lodge to be installed after lobbying
by Native American prisoners.
Rarely do such controversies
involve Jewish inmates. There are
only 51 people who identify them-
selves as Jews among the state's
40,000 inmates.
Of course, some religious com-
plaints are taken more seriously
than others. Prisoners have been
known to use religious conviction
as a pretext for receiving special
privileges, Ms. Light said. It is up
to prison officials to separate the
pious from the troublemakers.
She recalled one group of in-
mates who declared that its reli-
gion required them to eat sirloin
steak and drink Harvey's Bristol
Cream sherry. "We had some
problems with that," she noted.



Correction

Karen Spector and Maxine Weinberg have opened Salon Sydney
in Birmingham. A Kudos and Memos announcement on Dec. 29
incorrectly stated that Ms. Weinberg was formerly with Travel
Max. She remains with Travel Max.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan