100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 15, 1995 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DA NEWS page 37

12 MONTH
CERTIFICATE

5.5W

5,6

INTEREST RATE

A.P.Y./*

60 MONTH
CERTIFICATE

6.00s
• 1 3%/

INTEREST RATE

A.P.Y./*

These are fixed rate certificates of deposit that are insured by Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation (FDIC). A minimum opening deposit and balance of $500.00
is required to obtain the stated Annual Percentage Yield.

FIRST SECURITY;

Cr

SAVINgS BANk

"First in Service"

LENDER

CALL (810)338-7700 or (810)352-7700

Main Office 2600 Telegraph Rd. Bloomfield Hills, Mi 48302

*Annual percentage yield when compounded quarterly. Rate is accurate as of 12/15/95. Penalty for early withdrawal from certificate accounts may be assessed.

T
A
X
E
X
E
M
P
T

U
N

STOCKS TAX-FREE BONDS MUTUAL FUNDS

F,

First of Michigan
Corporation

Members New %WE Simi Exchange, Mt

FoM

A

A
L

Herman Schwartz

- Senior Vice President - Investments

P
L
A
•N
N

T

T
R
6230 Orchard Lake Road, Suite 230
U
West Bloomfield, MI 48322
S
(810) 855-2100
T
G
S
1-800-654-1443
TAX DEFERRED ANNUITIES IRA's MONEY MANAGEMENT

-

Is Your Financial House In Order??

FREE

To find out

call

PHASE FOUR

Certified Financial Planning Professionals

(810) 559-6980

Municipal
Bonds Listing 1,

Receive Weekly Report

JOEL LEVI, CFP
TRISH WELLMAN, CFP
17117 West 9 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48075
Phase Four Advisory, Registered Investment Advisor

Securities offered through Vestax Securities Corporation, Member, NASD & SIPC,
1931 Georgetown, Hudson, 01-144236 (216) 650-1660

.

Mernbier SEPC

G&wank &,Soninp

BOB

mCiiila

144200 14004659200

800 readers subscribed, while 400
to 500 copies were faithfully
stacked in apartment buildings,
Jewish agencies and Russian
stores every month.
Further cutbacks occurred af-
ter the Jewish Community Cen-
ter stopped printing the
newspaper. Today, Fonarik is typ-
ically 12 pages, but publishes only
1,000 copies each month, 50 of
which are sent to subscribers at
$6 per year. A Northville compa-
ny prints it.
The paper suffers not just from
a lack of funds, but from shifting
demographics as well. Fonarik al-
ways had a core audience of peo-
ple over 55 who had difficulty
learning a new language, but as
the Russian community has ma-
tured and spread out into the
northwestern suburbs, reader-
ship has dwindled.
"Most people under 50 got jobs
in their own fields after starting
out selling carpet. Their goal was
to eventually move to West
Bloomfield, and a great many did.
"They were interested in the
paper for the first few years, but
after they got Americanized, they
didn't need it and switched to
American newspapers," Dr.
Berton said. Russians who move
generally don't leave behind for-
warding addresses, so retaining
them as readers is difficult, if not
impossible.
The entrance in the market of
a Chicago-based, Russian-lan-
guage advertising journal called
Reklama and Detroitskiye Vesty
also led to the abandonment of
Fonarik by many of its advertis-
ers.
Yet, the group hasn't lost its
sense of purpose, despite the slow-
ing of immigration, competition
and the absence of a consistent
funding source.
Scraping up the $300 it takes
to publish every month has been
a matter of pure luck. This
month's issue was made possible
by one advertiser, but nobody on
staff is charged with the job of
selling ad space. It's by word of
mouth that they find benefactors.
"We keep getting to the end of
our rope and somebody comes to
our rescue," Dr. Berton com-
mented. One of her former stu-
dents at the JCC who moved to
New York helped by sending a
$500 contribution.
Competition from Detroitskiye
Vesty doesn't seem to irk the
group; Dr. Berton remarked with
equanimity that, "Some of their
issues are more interesting than
ours, and some of ours are more
interesting.
"I think Detroitskiye Vesty is
probably appealing to perhaps dif-
ferent people than we appeal to.
I think they realize there is a
market that hasn't been exploit-
ed. I think there's material (in the
newspaper) that is more appeal-
ing to young people, to be frank."
Of much greater concern than
competition is money.

"I am worried about only one
thing: right now, I have enough
money to go through February,
after which, if some money
doesn't come in, I quit," Dr.
Berton said.
"We need money. Not much
money, but we need it," Mr. Ku-
perstein added.
The Sheffers, who moved to
Detroit from Moscow almost
four years ago, take in enough
advertising revenue to publish
each month. They even sold an
ad to Uzbekistan Airlines in
New York. Plus, they are able
to pay local writers and foreign
correspondents in Toronto and
Israel.
Daughter Marina, a 27-year-
old ballet teacher, sells ads; Ms.
Melnikova lays out the paper on
a personal computer in the base-
ment and contributes the occa-
sional article, usually about
cuisine; Mr. Sheffer, a stout lin-
guistics professor turned tool and
die engineer, serves as its editor
at large, sometime writer and full-
time photographer.
The trio devotes most evenings
and weekends to the paper.
After Detroitskiye Vesty is de-
signed and laid out, 3,000 copies
are printed and distributed as far
away as Israel. Mr. Sheffer said
there are roughly 100 paid sub-
scriptions, but the paper just be-
gan taking them.
"They didn't take it seriously
at first, but then they started to
subscribe," Ms. Sheffer said.
"Especially those Russians who
want distance from newcomers,"
Mr. Sheffer, 50, added. Now, peo-
ple read the paper "because it's
interesting, something different
than what they have here," he
said.
But Detroitskiye Vesty doesn't
neglect the newly arrived. It car-
ries instructive articles, for ex-
ample, on financial planning and
insurance matters, written by ex-
perts in the fields.
'The writers feel they are help-
ing the community to explain the
life here," Mr. Sheffer said.
Detroitskiye Vesty is perhaps a
truer reflection than its counter-
part of the evolving Russian corn-
munity here — one that is
halfway in and halfway out.
"Some people who leave behind
the Soviet Union don't want to
hear anything about it; others are
full of reminiscences and left only
because they had to leave, and
their minds are still there," said
Ms. Sheffer.
"We will never be fully assim-
ilated," said Mr. Sheffer. "We
lived over there almost half our
lifetime. We have family and
friends there. We can't wipe our
hands of it." ❑
For informatio-
ut Fo narik,•
call Dr. Luba.

278 0397. To learn inore;

-

. out

1)etroitskiye Vesty , call Mil*: a

or Marina Sheffer at (810) 3
0769.

C-

r

N

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan