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November 17, 1995 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

•Q•111FINITI
Of Farmington Hills

ADLER page 15

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Moments later, Mr. Wishnet-
sky, who had taken a seat near
the front of the sanctuary, or-
dered everyone but the rabbi off
the bimah. A few congregants no-
ticed a revolver in the young
man's hand.
He fired one shot into the ceil-
ing and then read a brief, ram-
bling statement bemoaning the
"hypocrisy" of the synagogue.
"With this act, I protest a hu-
manly horrifying and hence un-
acceptable situation."
He then turned and in a soft
voice said, "Rabbi..." and shot
twice, striking Rabbi Adler in the
arm and in the head. As the
stunned congregation erupted in
bedlam, Mr. Wishnetsky turned
the gun to his own head and fired
again.
He died a few days later. Rab-
bi Adler lingered in a coma for a
month before succumbing.
It surprised no one who knew
the Adlers that the rabbi's wife,
Goldie Adler, expressed as much
concern and sympathy for the as-
sailant's family as for her own.
"The boy couldn't help it; he
was sick," Mrs. Adler assured Mr.
Wishnetsky's parents in the fran-
tic moments after the shooting.
Rabbi Adler's funeral was at-
tended by senators and gover-
nors, by labor leaders, by
African-American church offi-
cials, and by thousands of con-
gregants and friends.
Dr. Reuven Barlevav, a psy-
chiatrist and close friend of Rab-

bi Adler, said the rabbi's death
was in some ways more horrify-
ing than Mr. Rabin's "because it
occurred in the synagogue, in the
house of God. It was not in an at-
mosphere of inflamed political ri-
valries; it was totally
unexpected."
And yet in both cases, "the
shock for those who knew both
people was somewhat modulat-
ed by the knowledge that very
good people were left behind to
carry on," Dr. Barlevav added, al-
luding to Shimon Peres and Rab-
bi Groner.
For Rabbi Groner, though, the
tragedies defy comparison.
"The assassination of the
prime minister was a political act
... and it was not performed by
a deranged person, but was in-
tended to stop the peace process,"
he said. "The attack upon Rab-
bi Adler was the act of a very dis-
turbed young man who selected
Rabbi Adler because of a distor-
tion of his mental processes."
Mrs. Benstein said her family
took solace in the compassion
now being bestowed upon the Ra-
bins.
"The support kept aloft my
mother and my whole family. It
was unbelievable how people
came forward with all these
wonderful stories about how
helpful my dad had been to
them," she said.
"It is something you never for-
get and you live with all your
life." ❑

School Millage
Up For Renewal

JULIE EDGAR STAFF WRITER

W

alled Lake Schools
could lose nearly a
quarter of its teachers,
counselors and librari-
ans, athletic programs, bus trans-
portation and summer school if
voters reject a renewal of the dis-
trict's operating millage.
The effect of a rejection on
property values, said one top
school official, would be "devas-
tating."
Saturday's ballot proposal will
ask voters to renew the current
18 mills for businesses and four
mills for residences for another
10 years. The money generates
about 23 percent, or $20 million,
of the district's total operating
budget.
"It's what puts teachers in
front of kids, books on desks,"
said Walled Lake Consolidated
School District Assistant Super-
intendent Steven A. Gaynor.
The per-pupil allocation could
drop from just over $7,000 to
$5,600 without the renewal, he
said.

Dr. Gaynor said millage re-
newals in Michigan have been
generally successful since the
passage of Proposal A, which es-
sentially shifted the tax burden
for schools from the property tax
to the sales tax and lottery rev-
enues.
One mill represents $1 of every
$1,000 of state equalized valua-
tion, which is approximately half
what a house is worth on the
market. So, if a house is assessed
at $50,000 by the state, a four-
mill burden would amount to
$200 per year.
The millage renewal is distinct
from the bond proposals that
have been rejected three times
by voters in the district since late
1993. The bonds would have paid
for new schools in a district that
is bulging with students. Enroll-
ment grew by 587 students from
last year.
Dr. Gaynor said there are no
immediate plans to revive the
bond proposal, although the is-
sue is not dead.

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