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November 10, 1995 - Image 87

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE LYRIC CHAMBER ENSEMBLE
presents

THE BRIDGE ENSEMBLE

One of America's fastest rising chamber groups
- bridging the cultures of Russia and America through music -

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label for the heavy punk-influ-
enced music being made in Seat-
tle before Nirvana turned that
city into a mecca for talent scouts.
Hassidic. Don't look in the rap
section of the music store.
Heavy Metal. Another genre
that's been subdivided like crazy.
Metallica, AC/DC and Ozzy Os-
bourne still keep the banner fly-
ing, though.
Hip-Hop. The blanket head-
ing for street culture that includes
rap, bfeakdancing, scratching
and graffiti art. It's become an al-
ternative (sorry) term for less vi-
olent forms of rap, too.
Hot A/C. Adult Contemporary
that picks up the softer side of
CHR — the Cranberries or
R.E.M., for instance.
Industrial. Another accu-
rately descriptive label. Driving,
intense, mechanical music that
sounds like it was created in a
clanging, sweltering steel mill.
The masters of the art are Min-
istry and Nine Inch Nails,
though the lat-
ter has moved
in more melod-
ic directions.
Modern. As
in modem rock, a
preferable alter-
native to Alterna-
tive. Still a difficult
distinction, though,
considering bands
such as Hootie & the
Blowfish and Gin
Blossoms sound
like they were
transported via
some 1970s sound
machine.
New Age
Slightly more
tuneful than am-
bient, this mostly
instrumental
form uses bits of
jazz and touches
of folk. You can
play it for hours
and not remember a note of what
you heard.
New Jack/Jill. R&B that in-
corporates old soul values and
modem hip-hop techniques. Sam-
ple via Boyz II Men, Mary J.
Blige or Babyface.
New Wave. A defunct late
1970s/early 1980s term, even if
it does apply to three-quarters of
what we now call Alternative.
Pop. What? Do you think you
can get away with something this
general.
Power Pop. Punk meets CHR,
— the Monkees with louder gui-
tars, or proof that the Beatles' in-
fluence never dies. A group like
Green Day epitomizes the form.
Punk. It's about attitude as
much as music. Jerry Lee Lewis
was a punk; so were the Rolling
Stones, the MC5, the Sex Pistols
and the Clash. These days, Ran-
cid and Pennywise are among the
scores of bands carrying on the
tradition.
Rap. Beat-driven urban word

poetry that's evolved in directions
that are ugly (gangsta rap) or in-
triguing, such as the blending of
rap and jazz by Digable Planets
and Jazzmatazz.
Retro. A nicer name for oldies.
In respect to Alternative, it
means early punkers and new
wavers such as the Clash, the
Jam, or Duran Duran. Or a new
Lenny Kravitz album.
Rockabilly Twangy, rootsy
rock drawn directly from early
Sun Records legends such as
Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins and
Roy Orbison. With an under-
ground scene currently brewing,
this is likely the Next Big Thing.
Rock 'N' Roll. See Pop.
Ska. A frenetic form of reggae
blended with punk energy. It
made it to radio this year with
Rancid's Time Bomb.
Soul. The great days of Mo-
town and Stax may be gone, but
the good news is that Al Green
has returned to sec-
ular music and a
few youngsters,
such as D'Angelo,
are picking up the
mantle.
Speed Metal.
Just what the
name implies. It's
heavy — and
fast.
Techno.
Modern disco,
/4k
more electron-
ic sounding and mostly
instrumental, cre-
ated by Detroiters
such as Juan
Atkins and Kevin
Saunderson.
Thrash. More
rock 'n' roll ono-
matopoeia; it's an-
other form of
metal with a
more grinding
quality. Of course
there are still
some who would
use it to describe Chuck Berry.
Trick Hop. Hip-hop with
smooth grooves and a woozy psy-
chedelic ambience. Check out
massive attack or Soul II Soul.
Unplugged. Geez. Kiss just
did one of these acoustic sessions,
so it really is a genre in which
everyone can rent space.
Urban. The industry term for
soul, though it's a nice umbrella
that radio can play any kind of
R&B under.
World Music. Anything that's
polyrhythmic and comes from
anywhere south of the Equator.
It covers a lot of territory, much
of it worth exploring.
Young Country. The genre
that's left George Jones, Willie
Nelson and Dolly Parton in the
cold. Heck, even Garth Brooks
and Travis Tritt — whos
careers are less than a decade
old — seem like senior citizens
next to new, bucks like The Mav-
jo Michael Mont-
ericks- and hn
gomery. O

Mikhail Schmidt (violin), Susan Gulkis (viola), David Tonkonogui (cello), Karen Sigers (piano)

IN CONCERT

Sunday, December 3, 1995 - 3:30 p.m. Temple Beth El (Telegraph at 14 Mile)

MUSIC BY BRAHMS, MAHLER, SCHNITTKE

Admission: Adults $18 Students/Seniors. $15 Children 16 and under - $9
Groups of 10 or more - $12/person

CALL 810-357-1111 FOR TICKETS AND INFORMATION

Lyric Chamber Ensemble, 3000 Town Ctr., Ste. 408, Southfield, MI 48075

JET

Jewish Ensemble Theatre

World Wide Financial Services

& Big Daddy's Parthenon

PRESENT AN EXCLUSIVE OPENING NIGHT PERFORMANCE AND PARTY

• THE

diary

OF

NE FRANK

By FRANCES GOODRICH & ALBERT HACKETT

Directed By PAT ANSUINI

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19,1995

5:00 VIP DINNER AT BIG DADDY'S PARTHENON
7:00 PERFORMANCE AT AARON DEROY THEATRE

FOR TICKET
& EVENT
INFORMATION

Call: (810) 788-2900

r</

OR
Terri Shapiro,

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, • Public Relations
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