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November 10, 1995 - Image 39

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COMPILED BY ELIZABETH APPLES'

WZPS PHOTO BY SAMMY AVNISAN

Soothing Scents

At the end of a tough day at school or

work or home with the chil-

dren, there's nothing like a

nice bath to soothe away

all the aches and pains.

With these simple in-

structions, you can make

your own bath oil. All

!:itweitr"qttie

A winner on the
Israeli version of
"Wheel of Fortune."

you need is baby oil and

a dried herb or two, which

you combine then let sit for

liAl

hat if you went on a game show

and won $1 million? Would you
keep it all, or give some of it
away? How much would you
give to tzedakah? Which charities would
you donate to? Do you think Jews should
give to Jewish charities first? Which, if any

of the following, do you think should re-
ceive tzedakah:
*A home for the severely disabled.
*An art museum.
*A Jewish day school.
*A hospital for veterans.
*Programs for new immigrants to Israel.

I

Chaim Arlosoroff
Moses Arragel
Sholem Asch
Solomon Ashkenazi
Tzvi Ashkenazi
Hayyim Joseph David Azu-
lai
Isaac Babel
Leo Baeck
Simon Bamberger
,Rabbi Meir Bar-Ilan
Shabbetai Ben Joseph
Menachem Mendel Beilis
Eliezer Ben-Yehudah
Henri Bergson
Henry Berkowitz
Herman Bernstein
Bruria
Chaim Nachman Bialik
Nathan Birnbaum
Ernest Bloch
Mikhail Botvinnik

Yosef Chaim Brenner
Sir Israel Brodie
Robert Capa
Rene Cassin
Moses David Cassuto
Joseph Chazanovitz
Adam Cherniakov
Sir Frederick Cowen
Yitzhak Cukerman
Lewis Naphtali Dembitz
Jacques Derrida
Babette Deutsch
Meir Dizengoff
Dov Ber of Mezhirich
Profiat Duran
Paul Ehrlich
Jonathan Eibeschutz
Elias Ney
Eliezer Ben Hyrcanus
David Friedlander
Abraham Geiger
Gershom Ben Judah

lavender, or ezovyon in He-

brew. The talmudic tractate

Shabbat mentions lavender,

with its leaves used both as
a medicine and a perfume. Aromatherapy expert

the heart, and steadies the emotions, and makes a

very good evening bath for those who have difficulty

shoes. Would you be willing to risk your life as a
spy for Israel? For how long would you be able to
be away from your family and friends, living hi an
alien country and pretending to hate. Israel? In
what ways would you prepare for your work as a
spy in a foreign nation?
In addition to considering philosophical ques-
tions, expand your evening to practical activities.
If you were Elie Cohen living in Syria, how would
you dress? What kinds of food would you eat (Per-
haps you could prepare a meal of typical Syrian
foods?) What would be your daily habits? Do you
like the sound of Arab music?
Here are the names of some other lesser-known
figures, who nonetheless have fascinating stories
you may want to research.

Lea Goldberg
Abraham Goldfaden
Sidney Hillman
Fannie Hurst
Jules Isaac
Joseph Joachim
Joseph Jonas
Bertha Rachel Kalich
Tzvi Hirsch Kalischer
Ida Kaminska
Yoseph Klausner
Ferdinand Lasalle
Isaac Leeser
Shemaryahu Levin
Yitzhak Meir Levin
Max Liebermann
Moses Leib Lilienblum
Max Lilienthal
Maxim Litvinov
Solomon Maimon
Yehudah Leib Maimon
Peretz Markish,

One good herb to try is

Robert Tisserand notes that a lavender bath "warms

If I Were In Your Shoes

f you think Mata Hari was something else, you
should hear about Elie Cohen.
Cohen was a spy for Israel, assigned to work
in Syria. Before leaving for the Arab nation, he
studied everything from the food habits to par-
ticular linguistic trademarks of Syrian residents,
enabling him for many years to pass as an Arab
businessman.
The information Cohen uncovered was invalu-
able, but eventually he was discovered and exe-
cuted.
Elie Cohen is one of thousands of figures in Jew-
ish history whose names may not be immediately
familiar, but whose stories are remarkable.
Instead of simply reading about someone like
Elie Cohen, consider spending an evening in his

a few days before using.

Dov Berush Meisels
Sabato Morias
George Jean Nathan
Henri Nathansen
Solomon Neumann
Louise Nevelson
David Nieto
Hannah Orloff
Judah Loeb Pinsker
David Pinski
Louis Isaac Rabinowitz
Isaac Samuel Reggio
Havivah Reik
Julius Rosenwald
Cecil Roth
Nelly Sachs
Viscount Herbert Louis
Samuel
David Sarnoff
Avraham Shlonsky

in sleeping," and that lavender oil is excellent on a

compress for women in labor.

I

he coming week's Torah
portion, Genesis 23:1-25:18,
is Chayei Sarah.
After the death of Sarah,
Avraham buys the Mach-
pelah Cave in Hebron as a
burial site for his wife. Avra-
ham sends his servant to
find a wife for Yitzhak. The
servant devises a test by
which to recognize a
woman of good character.
He meets AsTaham's niece,
Rivka, who passes the test
and agrees to marry
Yitzhak. Avraham dies at
the age of 175 and is buried
in Machpelah Cave.
For a project, talk to your
, parents or grandparents about
before they were married. Ask
them what characteristics they
were looking for in a future spouse,
and how they recognized those in the person they we

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