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October 27, 1995 - Image 56

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BUILDING BLOCKS page 55

time. Hebrew Free Loan, which
just celebrated its 100th an-
niversary, acts as the collection
agency.
Another positive is that the re-
paid loans are enough to support
the program.
Nine years ago, the Project was
established with a $250,000 grant
from the UJF; since then, it has
financed over $60 million in prop-
erty, Mr. Singer said.
"These areas have perpetuat-

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.......

.

ed themselves," said Marion
Freedman, incoming director of
Neighborhood Project. "Now peo-
ple are attracted to those areas."
Neighborhood Project is not
isolationist. Its members work
with the school districts and lo-
cal governments of Oak Park and
Southfield and with organiza-
tions like the Chaldean Federa-
tion of America, the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People and the South-
field Lathrup Multi-
cultural Coalition. It
also sponsors com-
munity projects like
flower and tree
planting, the Kosher
Food Fair and hous-
ing workshops.
"People thought
this would create an
Ellis Island mental-
ity," where home
buyers would quick-
ly sell and move on,
said Ms. Freedman.
"It hasn't hap-
pened."
The Levines are happy in their Oak Park house.

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Project Executive
Plans On Retirement

IR

hoda Raderman never
says never, but she plans
on exiting the workaday
world and not returning
for a long time.
Ms. Raderman, the executive
director of the Jewish Federa-
tion's Neighborhood Project
since 1989, is retiring this year
to spend more time with her
husband Stanley. The two of
them will spend the winter in
Florida.
She retired once before, in
1988, after serving as assistant
executive director ofJewish Vo-
cational Service in Detroit for 15
years. She holds a master's de-
gree in rehabilitation counseling.
A year later, Ms. Raderrnan
joined Neighborhood Project, a
loan program designed to main-
tain the Jewish character of
neighborhoods in southeastern
Oakland County.
"I missed working, being part
of the Jewish community. When
this opportunity presented it-
self, it was really very exciting
to me," she said.
Her experience at JVS, as
well as her personal history,
played a role, too, in her decision
to join Neighborhood Project.
At JVS, she came into daily
contact with Jews too poor to
leave the city and cut off from
services of the Jewish commu-
nity. She believed in Neighbor-
hood Project's goal — to provide

,

an opportunity for Jews to stay
in older neighborhoods rather
than follow the exodus to the
northwestern suburbs.

Rhoda Raderman:
Leaving the Neighborhood.

"It was important to have
that as an option for people and
to finally stop what we had his-
torically been doing in Detroit,
which was constantly leaving
the city behind," she said
Ms. Raderman, a West
Bloomfield resident, called Mar-
ion Freedman, assistant execu-
tive director at Neighborhood
Project and her successor, "in-
credibly wonderful."
"She's been with the program
longer than I have. I feel so good
about leaving and knowing she'll
be in charge. There's-going to be
the continuity of what we
worked so hard to develop." ❑

-.J\/

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