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October 20, 1995 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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HEALTHIER page 51

For years we've been covering this community, inside and out, with the latest news
from neighborhoods, schools and synagogues. We've kept you covered with fast break-
ing stories, entertaining features and insightful commentary about Jewish life from
across the nation, Israel and the world. All written by award-winning journalists and re-

porters.
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people are always incredulously asking GARY COCHRAN,

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New looks: Carole Klein and Karen Shapiro.

"I grew up under the cloud of
breast cancer. I just wasn't pre-
pared at the age of 31 for this di-
agnosis," she told the Hudson's
crowd.
After a double mastectomy,
breast reconstruction and bone-
marrow transplant, Ms. Feldman
believed she had wiped out her
enemy. But on New Year's Eve,
1993, the doctor came back with
bad news. Her cancer had metas-
tasized.
For more than a year, Ms.
Feldman has waged a war on
several fronts. Against her dis-
ease. Against looking like a vic-
tim. Against acting like a victim.
And against an insurance corn-
pany, Blue Cross-Blue Shield of
Missouri, that refused to cover
her bone-marrow transplant —
despite the fact that she had tak-
en out a $2 million life insurance
policy.
Her story, covered by major
television networks, prompted
revision of state legislation gov-
erning insurance companies.
Working with actress Jill Eiken-
berry, a breast-cancer survivor,
Ms. Feldman also has created a
video for women called "Beauty
of Control."
Just as women have the abili-
ty to exercise control over their
appearance, so, too, can they take
charge of their illness itself, Ms.
Feldman stresses.
Shirley Malamud of Hunting-
ton Woods understands. Diag-
nosed with breast cancer in 1992,
Ms. Malamud watched her sis-
ter die of the disease. Like her sis-
ter, Ms. Malamud was
determined to study breast can-
cer, to do what she could to un-
derstand her treatment options.
"You have to go into this in-
formed," she says.
At the Hudson's event, Ms.
Malamud distributed informa-
tion provided by the Karrnanos
Cancer Institute (formerly the
Michigan Cancer Foundation), a
group for which she volunteers.
Equipped with more informa-
tion and a less-bouffant and
blonder wig, Ms. Klein reflects on
her own method of survival. She

continues to work in private prac-
tice as an attorney. An over-
whelming majority of her clients
have stuck by her side.
'What helps me feel good is not
thinking about it and going on
with normal life, which is what
I've done," she says. "I don't think
I could cope with feeling sorry for
myself" ❑

Mastering Stairs
Means Digging

JACK WILLIAMS

I

t's a scene played out every
weekday afternoon as rush
hour arrives on four wheels at
a health-club parking lot near
you.
People anxious to shift their
bodies into overdrive jockey for
the parking space closest to the
door, refusing to walk any dis-
tance to their destination.
And you wonder: Are these the
same people who would wait
minutes for an elevator before
they would take the stairs, yet
park themselves in front of a
StairMaster as soon as they lace
up their cross-trainers?
It's ironic.
There may be an element of
irony, too, in this recent study on
stair-climbing by researchers at
Illinois State University: slower
steps burn calories faster.
Those short, choppy steps many
of us take on the stair-climber in
the interest of speed? They are so
much wasted motion, according
to the study.
Climbers can expend 5 percent
more energy by taking deep, de-
liberate steps instead of shallow
ones, it turns out.
The longer steps engage larger
muscle groups, helping the heart
beat faster as it pumps more
blood and oxygen through the
body.
For best results, take steps 8 to
10 inches deep, suggests Dale B.
Brown, co-author of the study.
And support your own body

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