100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 22, 1995 - Image 114

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

halom

1995
5756

From

Gary Si Ira Kappy
and Ben Kosins

With wishes to our friends, relatives and customers
for the very best in
health, happiness and prosperity
on the New Year

Thank you for your wonderful and most appreciated support

Sheryl Siegel
Gwen Burns
Claudia Watson
Karen Smalls
Tony Maranski
Zofia Janik
Tremaine Holt

Arnold Siegel
William Anderson
Walter Shannon
Derwyn Robertson
Casper Machese
Norman Croco
David Drew
COLLECTIONS AT

(

Ci

REGULAR

A

i

BIG & TALL

In the former location of KOSINS CLOTHES
27881 Southfield Road between 11 and 12 Mile Roads
(810) 569-5405

THE SHOPS & SERVICES
OF
LINCOLN CENTER
WISH TO EXTEND A
HAPPY & JOYOUS
NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
& NEIGHBORS!

Farmer Jack
Baskin & Robbins
T. Nails
Bread Basket
Checker Bar-B-Q
Coats Unlimited
Dillman Chiropractic Life
Dots
Dollar Castle
Glory Jewelers

K-Mart
King Lim's Garden
Lincoln Barber Shop
Magic Touch Beauty Shop
Marianne Plus
Eye Right
Metropolitan Dry Cleaners
Nora's Fashions
Payless Shoes
Perry Drug Store

Radio Shack
Richard's Boys & Girls Wear
Secretary of State
Sherman's Foot Care
Strictly Kosher Meats
The Book Beat
Towne Theatre
Winkelman's

LINCOLN CENTER 10% MILE 81 GREENFIELD

Environment
Is Protected

DANNY BEN-TAL SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

W

hen discussing the role
of non-government or-
ganizations (NGO) in
protecting the environ-
ment, the Society for the Protec-
tion of Nature in Israel has a lot
to say.
With over 90,000 members,
the SPNI recently celebrated its
40th birthday by hosting an in-
ternational conference of similar
NGOs in Israel's Red Sea resort
town of Eilat.
Some 200 delegates from all
corners of the globe attended, rep-
resenting groups such as the
Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace
and the Sierra Club.
Delegates presented and corn-
pared a plethora of environmen-
tal challenges from countries with
as varied geographic, political and
economic backgrounds. "There is
about as varied a bunch of peo-
ple here as you'll see anywhere,"
said Jim Brent of the U.S. Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary Association.
"What unites us all is that we
care and want to do our bit to
make this world a better place to
live in."
"Environmental NGOs have
been the engine in reforming U.S.
environmental law," J. William
Futrell, president of the U.S. En-
vironmental Law Institute, point-
ed out to the conference
delegates. "NGO concerns shape
an issue and instill public debate
with urgency."
The SPNI, which has the legal
status of "representative of the
public," has led with a series of
ecological awareness campaigns,
the most famous being its three-
decade long crusade against pick-
ing Israel's indigenous
wildflowers, many strains of
which were under threat of ex-
tinction. The approach, educat-

Participants tour the Eilat Mountains.

ing the public by using posters
and stickers, proved wonderful-
ly successful. Today, no Israeli
would dream of picking wild-
flowers.
Thirty years later, the ongoing
campaign features posters in
Russian and Amharic aimed at
recent immigrants from the for-
mer Soviet Union and Ethiopia.
Thanks to strictly enforced
poaching laws, actively imposed
in Israel's national parks, previ-
ously endangered species such as
the gazelle, ibex and leopard have
returned to their natural habi-
tats.
The peace process has pro-
duced a new set of challenges to
protect the area's environment.
A coordinated regional environ-
ment plan is being drawn up un-
der the auspices of the World
Bank, including, for example, a
regional contingency plan for
dealing with possible Red Sea oil
spills.
Ultimately, said Kazo Kato, di-
rector-general of the Japan Fund
for Global Development, protect-
ing the environment lies in build-
ing partnerships between all
parties concerned: NGOs, gov-
ernments and business concerns.
"Promoting the growth of such
partnerships holds great promise
for the future of international co-
operation." [1]

Eilat Provides
A New Venue

MICHELLE MAZEL SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

T

ake the deep blue sea, end-
less coral reefs and a myr-
iad of colorful fish. Add a
sheltered, inviting bay and
warm sunshine the year round.
You now have the Israeli city of
Eilat at the southernmost tip of
the country, located on the great
African Rift Valley at the cross-
roads between three countries
and two continents.
The site has been settled since
biblical times and has known
many names:Etzion Gayer, Elah,

Eloth, Haila, and Urn Rash Rash.
Here the Hebrews, led by Moses,
halted on their way back from
Egypt. Later, Eilat was the gate-
way to the faraway lands of In-
dia and Africa as well as the
nearby Arabian peninsula.
When the State of Israel
gained independence in 1948, the
inhabitants of Eilat were land-
locked between what were then
two hostile countries: Jordan to
the east and Egypt to the west.
In 1979, Israel's peace treaty

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan