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September 08, 1995 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE: DETROIT/BUILDING BOOM AT HILLEL DAY SCHOOL;
BUSINESS/AN ARENA-SIZE SPORTS BAR AIMED AT COUCH POTATOES.

15 - 7R711
E
1

750

,aguismagemdrommainiam

THE

13 ELUL 5755 / SEPTEMBER 8, 1995

Of 'No' Interest
For 100 Years

/-

NEWS

inviipopm

Close Up: If The Trolls Only Knew What The JUPers Do ...

A pillar of community stability, Detroit's
Hebrew Free Loan Association marks its
landmark centennial on Sunday.

PHIL JACOBS EDITOR

13

o through He-
brew Free Loan's
record books
from decades ago
and you'll read
the carefully
handwritten and blotted
entries of loans for push-
cart horses. This was typi-
cal of how a peddler started
his business. And some of
those pushcarts led to busi-
nesses that continue today
in Detroit.
Now, 100 years later, the
minutes read almost re-
markably the same.
Though we're not talking
pushcarts, the need for a
loan for a used car to get a
person to work is as vital as
a horse once was.
But it doesn't have to be
a horse. It can be hand tools
for a vocation, money to
help pay college tuition or

agency's centennial cele-
bration set for 7 p.m.
Sunday at Congregation
Shaarey Zedek, can tell sto-
ries of how families used
their loans to begin their
lives anew. Then they do-
nated money to the agen-
cy.
She knows of people who
have kept their old pay-
ment books as a reminder
of how they were helped by
the Jewish community.
Many of those memories
will come alive at Sunday's
event, which will feature a
keynote speech by Nobel
Peace Prize winner Elie
Wiesel. The event is
chaired by Henry P. Lee.
Paul Hack is Hebrew Free
Loan's current president.
"We are not a charity,
nor are we a loan agency,"
said Mrs. Borman. "This
community has a
long history of
people helping
people. We know
that without
Hebrew Free
Loan, there
would be people
who might have
otherwise fallen
through the
cracks."
Dr.
Mark
Diem wasn't
falling through
any cracks, but
he knew almost
Loan applicants at the Hebrew
30 years ago that without
Free Loan office in the 1930s.
Hebrew Free Loan the pos-
sibility of medical school
would have been more dif-
funds to provide a modest ficult. Dr. Diem, who now
bar mitzvah for a child who sits on the HFL board and
RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER
might otherwise go with- on the Jewish Education
out. Whatever a person's Loan Service board as well,
o one knows.
reasons, Hebrew Free Loan needed help after his par-
Jewish communal profes-
has recorded well over ents, Rose and Sidney
sionals might join ranks of the
10,000 loans and has seen Diem, used their savings to
unemployed. Services to the
more than 97 percent re- help their son get started
needy might be slashed. And social-
paid.
in school.
welfare agencies might witness 17
Marlene Borman, HFL's
percent of their total revenue evap-
"I guess now that I'm on
immediate past president
orate.
who helped organize the NO INTEREST page 8
This fall, if the U.S. Senate ap-

By The

of

Gitche Gurnee

Forgotten communities, dotting Michigan's northern wilderness,
keep the faith despite forces threatening their extinction.

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

Story on page 32

Agencies Are Waiting
With Bated Breath

N

proves budget refoi nis proposed by
the House of Representatives, metro
Detroit's Jewish community stands
to lose $4 million in funding from
state and federal governments over
the next seven years.
"We just don't know what's going
to happen, and it's scary not know-
ing," says Judah Isaacs, senior plan-

ning associate at the Jewish
Federation of Metropolitan Detroit.
The ifs, coulds and maybes might
be resolved after Oct. 1, when mem-
bers of Congress will renew their bat-
tle for fiscal reform and a balanced
budget by the year 2002. Then again,
legislation could get mired in parti-
san bickering, thereby prolonging
Mr. Isaac's uncertainty.
"Everything's hanging in the bal-
ance," he says.
The plan adopted in mid-August
by the House calls for cuts in all fed-
eral programs except Social Security,
defense and the annual interest pay-

AGENCIES page 10

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