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September 02, 1995 - Image 66

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-09-02

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Sue Marx

volution is the word that best describes filmmaker Sue
Marx's career. She began her career as a photojournalist,
J but she is best-known for her 1988 Academy Award-win-
ning film Young at Heart, a documentary about two octogenarian
artists, her father Louis Gothelf and Reva Shwayder, who discov-
ered love late in life. Marx has also won 10 Michigan Emmy Awards
for a variety of projects, including her first documentary project, a
weekly series at Channel 4 called "Profiles in Black." Her train-
ing was on the job.
"I knew nothing about producing before this job. It all came to-
gether, my visual interests with my chutzpah, and a little luck," she
says.
Marx has just completed a series of films for the Detroit Zoo
that began showing in late October, and will continue to run all day,
every day, in the newly remodeled aviary. '1 he seven films and CD-
ROMs in kiosks accessible to the general public were narrated by

-r

,

64 • w INTE It 1995 • S Y I, E

great Michigan voices, including Tim Allen, James Earl Jones, Robert
Wagner, Julie Harris, Hugh Downs and Leigh Taylor Young.
Next up is a documentary spanning 10 months in the lives of
five Michigan competitive swimmers as they train, compete and try
out for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. "We'll be going through
the year of pain, suffering and smiles with the athletes," notes Marx.
With exciting projects and recognition, Marx points out her most
significant achievements "My marriage (to Hank Marx), my three
daughters, and my Oscar."
She also recognizes a wide support system over the years. "My
husband has very strong shoulders," says Marx. "And a lot of my col-
leagues, in and out of broadcast, are very strong and very helpful.
And they're almost all women."
"Women helping women is something happening more and more.
I think that's wonderful." Lisa Brody

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