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September 02, 1995 - Image 114

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-09-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

)011 110G SAYS LUXURY
LIKE A FUR,

■ OBODY SAYS IT

WITII MORE FEELING
TIM Funs BY ROBERT,

1"46 4R SINCE 1892

805 E. Maple

(Bet. Adams & Hunter)

Birmingham
(810) 647-9090

Survival 01 The Fittest

SERIOUS WORK BOOTS SINCE 187

en *Women
ate
Guaranteed.
Expertly Fit

Greg

SHOES

1 1 2 •

WINTER 1995 • STYLE

Orchard Mall

851-5566

West Bloomfield

"Serving the community for 39 years"

Beyond 2000/Stanley Winkelman

(continued from page 66)

mitment to and support for the arts in gen-
eral and fashion design in particular, is
an extremely important factor in the
leadership role of Paris at a time when
other countries are cutting back their sup-
port. The incorporation of fashion presen-
tation facilities as part of the modernization
of the Louvre is a fundamental aspect of
this policy. But even as we attempt to fore-
cast the direction of design in the 21st cen-
tury, there are two ideas we must keep in
mind about the future. Henry Ford II em-
phasized them in a lecture on fashion a
number of years ago. "The future will be
very different from the present, and what's
more, the future will be very different from
the way we envision it."

Beyond 2000/Fred Marx

(continued from page 66)

Consumers will expect expansive, in-
stock assortments, excellent values and
greater convenience. Once upon a time,
people shopped at certain stores almost ex-
clusively. We foresee heightened cross-
shopping from store-to-store and
format-to-format. Long gone are the days
when the store of choice was the hometown
hero. Retailing will become global, going
beyond today's trend of expanding coast-
to-coast.
We will continue to be an overstored na-
tion—currently there are 18 square feet of
merchandise for every person, compared
to 10 square feet two decades ago—with
more formats, not to mention more cata-
logs, home shopping networks and on-line
retail options. While convenience, espe-
cially via the information superhighway,
will continue to grow overall, shoppers will
still want to go to the store and see and feel
the merchandise. They will want to make
the purchase now and take the item with
them.
Retail shakeouts will continue, as the "big
boxes" move closer to the neighborhoods,
rather than searching for sites in the shad-
ows of regional malls. Stores achieving and
attaining success will be those defined with
a "point-of -view," as well as the staying
power to combat the breadth of selection
and financial clout of the chainstore oper-
ators.
Retailers in the next century need to be
more than merely "good." They will need

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