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September 01, 1995 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Make a winning play

by joining us at the
TEMPLE ISRAEL BROTHERHOOD

Opening Breakfast
Sunday, September 17, 1995
9:30 AM at Temple

Better Read Than Red

A Jewish author wins the Stalin Prize, then renounces communism.

WITH NATIONALLY SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Mitch Albom

$10 Members • $15 Guests
for advance reservations
$20 Members and Guests
at the door, depending on availability

RSVP no later than September 11

Space is limited
Reserve your
seats now!

✓ Bring family and friends!
✓ Open to the entire community
✓ Traditional sit-down breakfast
will be served by Morels

IM

MIN

INN MI MI

NM ME NM NM NM MI

Opening Breakfast

with Mitch Albom

Name

Phone

tickets at $10.00 each

('95-'96 Brotherhood members only)

tickets at $15.00 each (Guests)

total
Mail with check made payable to:
Temple Israel Brotherhood by September_11
Jeff Stewart
to:
6819 Burtonwood Drive
West Bloomfield, MI 48322

For insurance
call

SY WARSHAWSKY, C.L.U.

7071 Orchard Lake Road

Suite 110
In the J&S Office Bldg.

W. Bloomfield, MI
48322

(810) 626-2652

Office Phone

See me for car, home,
life and health
insurance

Like a good neighbor. State Farm is there.

I

Advertising in The Jewish News
Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today.
Call 354-6060

Q: Was Dorothy Parker Jewish?
Q: Is it true that an American
A: Halachically Dorothy
Jewish author won the 1953 Stal-
Parker was not Jewish, though
in Peace Prize?
she regarded herself Jewish
A: Yes. Howard Melvin Fast and generally was thought of
was the winner of that won- as Jewish by those who knew
derful award anyone would be
so very, very proud to display her.
Born in 1893 as Dorothy
on his mantlepiece.
Born Walter Ericson Rothschild, she was the daugh-
ter of a prosperous German-
in 1914 in New York, Jewish
New York merchant
Fast had his first story, and his Catholic
wife, who was
"The Children," pub- of Scottish ancestry.
Educated
lished in 1937. He 'sub- at Catholic schools,
Parker
sequently wrote a nonetheless was treated
and
number of novels, many felt
like
an
outsider.
of which deal with
She married Eddie Parker,
American history, in- who
was from an upper-class,
cluding Conceived in
England family. Addict-
Liberty, The Unvan- New
ed
to
drugs and alcohol, Eddie
quished, Freedom Road did not
make a good husband
and The Immigrants.
and
the
marriage broke up.
His works also ad-
blamed the failure on
dressed Jewish themes, Dorothy
the
fact
that it was a mixed
like the Picture-Book
History of the Jews, and marriage.
Parker's vacillation between
social issues, such as a Jewish
and gentile identity
The Passion of Sacco was known
to her fellow wits
and Vanzetti.
Fast was for years a at the famous Algonquin
Round Table. When Alexander
dedicated communist Woollcott ordered George S.
and active member of Kaufman to, "Shut up, you
the American Commu- Christ killer," Kaufman stood
nist Party, a commit- up and said he would leave,
ment that culminated in "And I hope that Mrs. Parker
his receiving the Stalin will walk out with .me —
Prize.
Theodor Herzl: His dream lives, his children did
But in later years, in halfway."

Q: Were Theodor Herzl's children
active in the Zionist movement, and
where are his descendants today?
A: Herzl was 44 when he died
in 1904 of pneumonia and heart
disease. He never saw his chil-
dren attain adulthood. Some
think it was so much the better.

MI

not.

Herzl's eldest child, Pauline,
was mentally unstable, promis-
cuous and a drug addict. In
1930, she died at the age of 40
in a hospital in Bordeaux,
France.
His son, Hans, born in 1891,
was afflicted with bi-polar dis-
order (manic-depression). Reli-
giously unfocused, he converted
to several faiths, including a
number of Christian denomi-
nations. He visited Pauline in
Bordeaux, and on the day of her
burial he shot himself.
The youngest child, Mar-
garethe (known as Trude), born
in 1893, also was unstable. In
1943, the Nazis sent her to the
Theresienstadt concentration
camp, where she perished.
Herzl's only grandchild was
Trude's son, Stephan Theoclor
Neumann, born in 1918. A res-
ident of England, he changed
his surname to Newman. He
was a captain in the British
army in World War II, and lat-
er served as an economic ad-
viser to the British embassy in
Washington, D.C. In 1946, he
committed suicide by jumping
from a bridge into the Potomac
River. He had no children.

large part because of
Stalin's reign of terror, Fast re-
nounced communism, a deci-
sion he discussed in his book
The Naked God.

Q: I heard that a section of the
famed Tate Gallery in London is
named for a Jew. Can Tell Me Why
elaborate?
A: You must be thinking of
the Lord Joseph Duveen (1869-
19391 wing.
At the turn of the century,
Duveen, a native of Britain, be-
gan dealing in paintings, first
in London and then the Unit-
ed States, where he worked
with an elite group of Amer-
ican millionaires.
Duveen,
who spe-
cialized
in English
art from the
18th and 19th
centuries, was
knighted in 1919
and made a
baron in 1933. It
was he who donated the funds
for the Tate wing named in his
honor.

Q: I have family visiting from Is-
rael and they brought me a very
odd gift: rose-petal jam. I've nev-
er heard of such a thing. Who
came up with this strange idea?
A: Strange or not, rose-petal
jam is hardly a new concoction.
This sweet delicacy (which
most definitely does taste like
roses) is mentioned in the
Shulchan Aruch as a favorite
food among medieval Jews.
And while it's a rarity in the
United States (though it can
be found at certain specialty
shops), rose-petal
jam continues to
be popular
throughout
the Middle
East and Eu-
rope.

Send questions to "Tell Me Why"
c I o The Jewish News, 27676
Franklin Rd., Southfield, MI
48034 or send fax to 354-6069.

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