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August 18, 1995 - Image 126

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-08-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

This Summer's Fruits
Are Sweet And Savory

ETHEL HOFMAN SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

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ANIERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY'

t seems impossible we could
ever tire of summer's soft
fruits — berries, peaches and
plums — which have ripened
to a natural sweetness in the
warm sunshine." One bite and the
pure juices burst out to dribble
down your chin. That's the stuff
nostalgia is made of.
But when the taste for fresh
summer fruits eaten out of hand
wanes (as it inevitably does), and
the palate is tired of the ubiqui-
tous cut-up fresh fruit salad, what
do you do to satisfy?
Fear not. A little imagination
can serve up some exciting com-
binations of summer's culinary
pleasures.
The medley of recipes below
run the gamut from sweet to
spicy to savory, from perfect
ripeness to plain hard — all
adding up to a blend of lively fla-
vors.
Reduce cooking time for fruits
on the soft side. Unless berries or
fruits are being used for sauces,
where breakdown is necessary,
fruits should hold their shape —
whether in compotes, pies or
cakes.
Recipes are quick and easy,
even for beginners, and a de-
lightful change when you tire of
eating out of hand.
TO CHOOSE AND STORE
THE BEST
• Farmer's markets and road-
side stands usually have the
freshest and best produce. Shop
often. This is where you may find
unusual fruits such as red cur-
rants and gooseberries.
• Look for berries that are
plump with good color. If packed
in baskets, turn over and look for
staining, which means overripe
or spoiled berries.
• All soft berries, such as
strawberries, blackberries and
raspberries, should be refriger-
ated and used within 24 hours of
buying. Cherries may be kept up
to three days in the refrigerator.
Wash gently just before using.
• 1/2 pint berries equals 1 cup.
• All berries are high in fiber,
low calorie and fat-free. 3/4 cup
of blackberries contains 65 calo-
ries; 1 cup of strawberries con-
tains 55 calories and, with
excellent Vitamin C content, are
a refreshing change from orange
juice.
• Choose mangoes that yield
to gentle pressure, with unshriv-
eled skin and free of discoloration
When ripe, has a pleasant floral
smell. If hard, ripen at room tem-
perature, two-three days.
• Choose plums that yield to
gentle pressure (rock-hard plums
have little flavor). Fruit should

be smooth-skinned, good color,
with no blemishes. Store ripe
plums in refrigerator. Do not re-
move the thin skin — an excel-
lent source of fiber.
• Honeydew melons with pale
green flesh are ripe when skin is
pale green to cream. The blossom
end should yield slightly when
pressed.

SOFT BERRIES
IN CINNAMON SYRUP
(PARVE)

1 pint small strawberries, hulled,
or medium berries, halved and
hulled
1/2 pint raspberries
1/2 pint blackberries
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon grated lemon rind
2 tablespoons sugar
Syrup: 1/4 cup currant jelly
juice from berries
1/2 cup semi-dry white wine
(chablis or chardonnay) or
apple juice
1 cinnamon stick (2-3 inches
long) cut in half
3-4 grinds black pepper
Softly whipped cream for
garnish (optional)

Wash berries under cold run-
ning water. Leave in colander 5
minutes or so to drain. Transfer
to medium bowl. Pour lemon
juice and rind over and sprinkle
with 2 tablespoons sugar. Stir
gently to mix. Set aside for 30
minutes to release fruit juices,
stirring occasionally.
Prepare syrup: Pour off fruit
juices and scrape any sugar at
bottom of bowl into a small
saucepan. Add currant jelly, wine
or apple juice, cinnamon stick and
pepper. Stir over low heat until
combined and currant jelly is dis-
solved. Turn up heat to high and
bring to rolling boil and continue
boiling for 2-3 minutes to reduce.
Cool slightly. Remove cinnamon
stick before pouring over berries
in bowl (save cinnamon stick for
garnish). Chill.
To serve: Separate cinnamon
stick bark. Top each serving with
a dollop of whipped cream and in-
sert a sliver of reserved cinnamon
stick.
Serves 4.

MELON AND MANGO
MASH (PARVE)

2 tablespoons honey or to taste
3 cups ripe honeydew melon,
diced
1 large ripe mango, peeled and
sliced
2 tablespoons mint leaves
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons canned coconut
cream
grated rind of 1 lime for garnish

Warm honey by zapping in mi-
crowave for 15-20 seconds until
runny but not bubbling. Set
aside. Place melon, mango and
FRUITS page 128

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