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August 18, 1995 - Image 106

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-08-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PROBLEM: HIGH UTILITY BILLS??

Enemies: A Love Story

Months after his arrest as an "enemy,"
a Jewish student joins the British army.

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM ASSOCIATE EDITOR

11O4 •1t4

A

nyone who has ever visit-
ed a museum, but with re-
strictions ("Mom! This is
boring! When are we go-
ing to go?" "Honey, I've had about
as much of this culture as I can
take. Can we get home so I can
see the game?"), understands the
frustration of not having the
chance to appreciate an entire
collection.
Now you can enjoy the thou-
sands of treasures in one of the
world's finest collections, the Is-
rael Museum of Jerusalem, with-
out even stepping out your door.
The Israel Museum (Ven-
dome Press) is a complete guide
to the museum's extensive col-
lection — including biblical and
historical finds, Judaica and
works by the masters — that also
features more than 200 color il-
lustrations.

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a new vessel for lights used at
Jewish holidays or during cele-
brations, such as Chanukah,
Shabbat, Havdalah or a wedding.
Two years later the collection
went on display, first at the Jew-
ish Museum and then in the
United States, Germany and Hol-
land. Among those included: a
red plastic, metal and rubber
menorah by Achille Castiglioni
of Italy, a Shabbat candle holder
by Richard Meier of the United
States, and a menorah with mul-
ticolored ribbons by Leo Lionni,
also the author ofAlexander and
the Wind-up Mouse and a num-
ber of other children's books.

Nazi criminals, including Hein-
rich Himmler.

T

here are two new books for
the peaceniks on your shop-
ping list: Israel, Palestine
and Peace (Harvest
Books), a collection of essays by
Amos Oz, and The Vocabulary
of Peace: Life, Culture and
Politics in the Middle East
(Mercury House) by Shulamith
Hareven.
Mr. Oz, for years an advocate
of a both an Israeli and Palestin-

NI

ark Lynton is a man
who bears no grudges.
He was born Max-
Otto Ludwig Loewen-
stein in Germany, the son of
affluent Jews who sent their boy
to school at Cambridge.
Then the war broke out.
At first, little changed for Max,
who continued his studies and
greatly enjoyed life
in Britain. But in
1940, British offi-
cials arrested Max
and other Austrian
and German na-
tionals. There was
no proof that they
were spies, but it
was better not to
take chances. The
men were sent to
interment camps.
In Accidental
Journey: A Cam-
bridge Internee's
From The Israel
Museum: A display Memoir of World War
II (Overlook Press), Mr.
of menorah,
Lynton (he changed his
Shabbat
name after joining British
candlesticks and
other vessels for
forces, in case he was cap-
light.
tured) recalls his adven-
tures during the war.
He says he was never bitter,
just surprised, when he was tak-
Edited by Israel Museum di- en away as a German national.
rector Martin Weyl, it includes
"I was so British then, partly
remarks from museum curators because I came from a family with
Rivka Gonen, Ya'akov Meshorer an almost worshipful admiration
and Yigal Zalmona, some of the of all matters British...and partly
leading experts on such topics as because refugees in general fre-
archaeology and Judaica.
quently became plus royalist que
The Israel Museum is divided le roi in their adoptive countries."
into four chapters comprising art,
Mr. Lynton was released after
archaeology, Judaica and the mu- one month and enlisted in the
seum's youth wing (where hands- British army, though initially as
on projects are a daily adventure). a "friendly" enemy alien he was
Featured are both permanent allowed to serve only with a non-
and temporary exhibits; among combatant corps. He later joined
the latter included in the book is the Third Royal Tank Regiment
a 1985-1986 project sponsored by where he became a major, and by
the museum's design department. the end of the war was a leader
The project asked artists to create in the effort to capture and try

Amos Oz: Grandma, modern writers
and Zionism.

ian state, considers a variety of
topics, ranging from the role of
writers in society to his grand-
mother's death to how the dream
of Zionism has changed.
"Why didn't Israel develop as
the most egalitarian and creative
social democratic society in the
world?" he asks in Has Israel Al-
tered Its Visions? "I would say
that one of the major factors was
the mass immigration of Holo-
caust survivors, Middle Eastern
Jews and non-socialist and even
anti-socialist Zionists who ached
for 'normalization.' The Holocaust
convinced many Jews that the
cruel game of nations had to be
played according to its cruel laws:
statehood, a military establish-
ment and a pessimistic concept
of the use of military power."
In The Vocabulary of Peace,
Ms. Hareven offers essays con-
sidering such topics as the in-
tifada and peace "without love,"
and one that juxtaposes a portrait
of a Jewish settler with an Arab
terrorist.
Ms. Hareven, a native of
Jerusalem, is a former member
of the Haganah and author of nu-
merous books including City of
Many Days and Twilight and
Other Stories.

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