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August 11, 1995 - Image 122

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Johannesburg (JTA) — South
African Deputy President F.W.
de Klerk has called on Jewish
communities worldwide to be-
come advocates of the "cause of
the new South Africa."
"There was much injustice in
this country," de Klerk said at
the recent biennial conference of
the Commonwealth Jewish
Council.
"A lot of courage has been
shown in bringing an end to that
injustice," he said. "It has
created for all South Africans
a new window of opportunity
and if we stick to our task and
retain our commitment, this
country is destined to become a
success story."
In his address, he also said he
appreciated the international
support South Africa received
"in this period of dynamic
change."
Such support had come from
Jewish communities around the
world, from Israel, from the coun-
tries of the Commonwealths Jew-
ish Council and from the
Commonwealth as an institu-
tion.
The Commonwealth is a free
association of sovereign states
that recognize the British sover-
eign as its head. Member coun-
tries include South Africa, the
United Kingdom, Canada and
Australia.
The fact that South Africa was
the location for the conference
was seen by some as another ex-
ample of its effort at reintegra-
tion into the international
community.
Also at the conference, Chief
Rabbi Cyril Harris called on or-
ganized South African Jewry to
help bridge the gap between the
country's "haves" and "have-
nots."
He spoke about South African
Jewry and the tensions it faces,
particularly the potential for fric-
tion due to racial, ethnic and re-
ligious differences.
"Because South Africa is so
heterogeneous, it is absolutely
essential that we create bridges
between one community and an-
other," the chief rabbi said.

Jews, Muslims
Education Battle

London (JTA) — Although the
Middle East may conjure up im-
ages of peace, it appears to have
had a negative effect as of late on
the community of Manchester,
England.
There, representatives of the
Jewish and Islamic communities
who serve on a local committee

are at odds over the approval of
a religious education curriculum
for the city's schools.
Model religious education syl-
labi for schools drawn up by the
national Schools Curriculum and
Assessment Authority refer to Is-
rael as "a special place for Jews."
Umar Hegedus, a Muslim ed-
ucator consulted by the authori-
ty, said he did not have a problem
with this model.
But this is not the case in
Manchester.
Jewish committee member
Henry Guterman said the Mus-
lims protested Jewish references
to "the land of Israel, Jerusalem
and the rebuilding of the Tem-
ple."
Mr. Guterman added that the
Muslims had responded with a
"highly objectionable" syllabus of
their own.
In reference to contemporary
Muslim causes, it included
"Palestine under Zionist occupa-
tion, where illegal Russian Jew-
ish settlers fire randomly, killing
scores of children."
Similar disputes do not seem
to have occurred in other com-
munities in England.

News Agency
Has New Editor

New York (JTA) — Kenneth
Bandler, who worked at the Na-
tional Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council for about
a decade, has been named man-
aging editor of the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
Mr. Bandler, 38, at work in the
JTA newsroom since mid-July,
succeeds Rifka Rosenwein, who
left the worldwide news agency
in April.
As managing editor, Mr. Ban-
dler is responsible for assisting
JTA Editor Lisa Hostein in over-
seeing editorial operations for the
78-year-old news agency.
One of Mr. Bandler's prima-
ry responsibilities is supervis-
ing JTA's New. York-based
writers and working with them
to develop fresh, timely stories
on issues and events impacting
the lives of Jews in North Amer-
ica.
He is also responsible for edit-
ing and supervising production
of JTA's weekly Community
News Reporter, which chronicles
Jewish communal and organi-
zational news.
Mr. Bandler said that for a
long time, he has had an inter-
est in working in daily journal-
ism, which is one of the reasons
he seized the opportunity to work
at JTA.
Mr. Bandler has authored ar-
ticles on the Middle East for var-
ious publications, including
numerous Jewish newspapers,
Present Tense magazine and the
Christian Science Monitor.

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