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June 30, 1995 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE: DETROIT/ TRI-TRIPPIN' THROUGH ISRAEL;
BUSINESS/ FACING THAT FUTURE COLLEGE BILL.

750

DETROIT

THE JEWISH NEWS

2 TAMMUZ 5755/JUNE 30, 1995

Adrenaline Rush

Allied Jewish Campaign surges $850,000 in 1995.

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

or the first time in three
years, Federation is an-
nouncing an increase to its
Allied Jewish Campaign,
projected to reach $26.85
million by the end of 1995.
"We've got it moving
again," says Robert Slatkin,
one of four Campaign
chairmen. "We're very
proud."
From 1992 to 1994, the
Campaign remained flat at about $26 mil-
lion. Although the Jewish Federation has
not yet secured pledges from all potential
givers, officials expect to bring in $850,000
more than last year's total. They attribute
success to new Campaign strategies and
an improved economy.
Locally, beneficiary agencies — like
Jewish Family Service and the Jewish
Community Center — anticipate boosts to
their annual allocations, to be announced
by Federation on July 11.
Alan Goodman, executive director of
JFS, says his agency welcomes the extra
money. But he worries that possible cut-
backs from other funding sources, such as
the government and the United Way,
might limit programming in 1996.
"We are thankful for an increase (from
Federation) this year. It pretty much keeps

us level," he says. "It's hard to predict ex-
actly what is going to happen later."
Campaign chairmen for 1995 included
Robert Slatkin, Norman Katz, Florine
Mark Ross and Kenneth Eisenberg. They
attribute this year's increase to three fac-
tors.
First,
volunteerism
was
up.
Unprecedented numbers of people from
temples, synagogues and other Jewish or-
ganizations participated in Campaign
phonathons like Super Sunday in
November and April's Days of Decision.
The involvement, leaders say, was stim-
ulated in part by a shorter Campaign, as
well as by Federation outreach efforts and
cooperation between religious and secular
groups in the community.
Face-to-face fund-raising, which tar-
geted 1,000 givers this year — substan-
tially more than last year — also reaped
rewards. In line with Federation's goal to
make the Campaign a more personalized
affair, leaders sought to train volunteers
in one-on-one solicitation. Michael Gilbert,
a Campaign director, says this approach
holds at least two advantages.
"It enables us to have a feedback mech-
anism with our supporters and a much
closer relationship with them. There's give-
and-take. Frequently," he says "a face-to-

ADRENALINE RUSH page 8

Akiva and developer search for options as Lathrup Village council
prepares to deny a re-zoning request.

JILL DAVIDSON SKLAR STAFF WRITER

A

WHO ACTUALLY MALES ALIYAH?

How AND WHY? OLIM FROM

DETROIT REVEAL WHETHER THE

PROMISED LAND HAS LIVED UP

TO THEIR GREAT EXPECTATIONS.

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

developer who hopes to level Akiva
Hebrew Day School and build a strip
mall will head back to the drawing
board after Lathrup Village council
members indicated they would reject a re-
zoning request.
Jeffrey Surnow of the Surnow Co. said
he is unsure of his plans for the site, but
that a purchase agreement still stands be-
tween his company and the school.
"I don't know exactly what I am going to
do just yet," Mr. Surnow said. "But what
is certain is that the school and I are still
under contract."
Akiva agreed to sell the building to Mr.
Surnow in November 1994 for $1.3 million,
with the contingencies that the school find
another building and the developer be
granted re-zoning. If either is impossible,
the deal would fold.
Akiva, meanwhile, is seeking to buy or

construct another building to accommo-
date its growing student population. The
school is looking for classroom space to rent
in order to relocate its kindergarten and
pre-school programs because no rooms are
available in which to house those classes.
So far, the school has not found a suit-
able site in an area close to the student
population. Most Akiva students reside in
Southfield or Oak Park.
At a village meeting held June 19, Mr.
Surnow presented five proposed uses for
the land located at 27700 Southfield Rd.
To accommodate these plans, he request-
ed that the council re-zone, from public
service to commercial use, the land on
which the school building sits. The change
in zoning would allow the construction and
operation of a commercial venture.
The Lathrup Village Historical Society,

ZONING page 10

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