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June 09, 1995 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-06-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

candidates because he was upset
with the direction in which he
perceives the temple to be head-
ing.
"I felt so uncomfortable with
where we are going that I con-
sidered leaving the temple for the
first time," he said.
Other candidates include Stan-
ley Clamage, first vice-president;
Diane Siriani, treasurer; Byron
"Buddy" Siegel, secretary; and
Sydney Blum, David Hearshen,
Lawrence Kraft, Richard Roberts,
Phillip S. Schaengold and Paul
Stein, candidates for the board of
trustees.
Officially, 13 positions are up
for renewal: five one-year officer
positions and eight three-year
trustee posts. Three of those run-
ning on the official slate will go
unchallenged by the opposition
slate: Lawrence Epstein, second
vice-president; and for trustee,

Gerald Levin and Debra Bern-
stein-Siegel.
Another candidate who is run-
ning for a one-year term, Jeffrey
Lipshaw, also will go unchal-
lenged.
The opposition candidates each
must submit a petition signed by
50 members of good standing by
June 9 in order to be included on
the ballot. As of Tuesday, one pe-
tition had been turned in and the
rest were expected to be submit-
ted by the end of the week, Mr.
Mitchell said. The temple board's
official slate includes Mr. Kamins,
president; Fredrick Simon, first
vice president; Lawrence Epstein,
second vice president; Marion
Freedman, treasurer; Alan May,
secretary; and Debra Bernstein-
Siegel, Dennis Frank, Lois Geren-
raich, Lucy Gersten, Gerald
Levin, Sanford Passer and Judith
Schwartz, trustees. O

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JILL DAVIDSON SKLAR STAFF WRITER

illel parents have been
through a lot in the past
few months.
First there was the an-
nouncement of the capital cam-
paign, which put the onus on the
parent body to raise $11 million
for an addition to the school and
a larger endowment fund.
Then there were the months
of study and debate regarding a
$5 million gift from Jay Kogan
that carried the stipulation that
the school move. When that is-
sue was settled by a construc-
tion deadline that would make
a move impossible, many par-
ents breathed a sigh of relief
that the future of the school
would finally be clear: a grade
school with an addition located
on Middlebelt Road.
But Hillel parents were
thrown yet another curve last
week. Mr. Kogan, owner of the
Oakland Mall, announced at the
school's annual dinner that he
would still give the money but
$1 million would be used to en-
dow grade-school programs and
$4 million would go toward the
building of a high school.
The $4 million gift is actual-
ly a challenge grant. The school
will have to match the funds,
Hillel President Robert Schostak
said. There has been no time
limit set on the grant.
The school is the midst of its
Generations Campaign, which
will supply $11 million. So far,
$6.7 million of the $8 million for
the addition has been raised and
$1 million of the $3 million goal
for an endowment has been com-
mitted. No plans have been for-
mulated by the school to raise
the matching funds.

PER MONTH

36 Mo. Smart Lease

"We are concentrating on the
campaign and getting the addi-
tion started right now," Mr.
Schostak said.
For many parents of former,
current and future Hillel stu-
dents, the challenge of building
a school is a welcome one.
To those parents, the possi-
bility of a high school represents
a selling point for the Detroit
Jewish community. People who
are looking to relocate but want
to provide their children with a
Conservative Jewish high school
education will no longer over-
look Detroit as a viable place to
live.
In addition, the high school
brings with it an option of hav-
ing a non-Orthodox Jewish
choice after eighth grade.
Allan Nachman, a member of
the Hillel board and the father
of two college-aged Hillel alum-
ni, was excited by the an-
nouncement even though his
own children are not affected by
it.
"I am wholly supportive of the
concept of the high school," he
said. "A child leaves Hillel in the
eighth grade and doesn't have
the support for the education he
received by having a high school.
This would remedy that."
For others, their skepticism
regarding the quality of a new
school without a proven track
record would cause them to care-
fully consider a Hillel high
school as a viable option for their
children. High-quality local pub-
lic schools as well as nationally
acclaimed private schools such
as Detroit Country Day or
Cranbrook would prove tough

HILLEL HIGH SCHOOL page 20

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