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June 09, 1995 - Image 101

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-06-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

What do you see as some
of the issues in your district?

How do you plan on
addressing those issues?

What are your views on
public-school prayer?
What about a voluntary moment
of silence?

The recent passage of the $30 million bond proposal will mean
that plans developed in Vision 2010 will be implemented. The
"separateness" of the three communities in our district. State
issues including school finance, charter schools and vouchers
and revision of the state school code.

As a board member, it's important to make well-informed deci-
sions related to the renovation and construction that will take
place. I will reach out to citizens to communicate information and
understand concerns they may have. I will represent our entire
school district always with the best interests of children in mind. I
anticipate Berkley School Board will continue to have contact with
our legislators on these issues.

Unfortunately, a voluntary moment of silence to reflect on
something like the Oklahoma tragedy is rarely voluntry and is
usually disruptive. Children may not feel comfortable if they do
not respond to the announcement of a voluntary moment of si-
lence. Religious values must be taught in the home or place of
worship, not in the school.

Drug and alcohol use, open lunches at the high school,
how the bond proceeds will be spent and the existence of a
certain amount of negative feelings toward the schools in the
community.

I would support the administration in their continuing efforts to
control drug and alcohol use in the school. I plan to listen to par-
ents voice their concerns over the school lunch program and
work with the administration to address them. I also plan to meet
regularly with community groups to give them information on our
activities and receive their suggestions.

Organized prayer has no place in our public schools. I do not
feel a moment of silence tied to this purpose is a good idea.

With passage of the recent bond issue, it's important to make in-
formed choices as to the distribution of those funds, to see that
they are spent for the maximum benefit of the students of the
district. Studies indicate alcohol and drug use is on the rise in the
district and it's important to have a district-wide education pro-
gram. Continued full funding for our public schools.

I feel that the best interest of the child must be the first priority.
Fiscal responsibility to assure continued excellence of the district.
Prioritized spending decisions. Any drug education program
must include the entire community.

I feel that a person's faith is a private and very personal part of
life. The freedoms that we have allow each of us our own be-
liefs. We can worship in the home, church or synagogue of
our choice. It is possible to have a moment of silence without
it being institutionalized.

School funding and implications for local control. School code
revision. Public funds spent on public schools.

We need to maintain the quality of education with fewer dollars
than in the past. In my business it's possible to maintain and even
improve the quality of service while spending fewer dollars. It
makes sense that the same is true in education. We must involve
educators in the process of revising the school code. It is most
important to continue the use of public funds for public schools.
Charter schools should be funded by dollars that are outside the
state-aid act. Private schools need to continue their own private
means of support.

As a religious-school teacher and public-education activist, I be-
lieve in the rationale behind our constitutional separation of
church and state. As such, I oppose any organized form of
prayer in the public schools.

The renewal of the hold-harmless millage on homesteads au-
thorized by legislation in Proposal A. Adequately fund high-
quality public education. Maintain provisions in the school code
that facilitate meeting students' needs. Maintaining the separa-
tion of church and state.

It is essential that members of the board work collaboratively to
address these and other complex issues. Approaches to consider
include seeking innovative financing solutions consistent with
community interests, advocating for appropriate solutions work-
ing with state legislators and encouraging strong grass-roots sup-
port for existing constitutional language ensuring that publicly
collected tax dollars fund only public schools.

I do not advocate any changes to existing legislation in regard
to prayer in school. I am opposed to any publicly conducted
prayer or moment of silence in public school.

When someone looks at the total budget of the Oak Park
School District, they see numbers like $23 million. When the
layperson sees a fund balance of $80,000 they again see a lot
of money. However, when put in proper perspective, this fund
balance represents less than .5 percent of the total budget. Very
soon, the district is going to have to cut more programs to sur-
vive.

Ultimately, when it comes to cutting programs, an uncomfortable
practice at the very least, one has to be guided by two principles.
First, the programs that affect students the most are the last to be
affected. Second, programs from which we reap the greatest ben-
efits for the largest group of students would also be last to be cut.

There should be absolutely no sanctioned prayer in school, vol-
untary or otherwise. One of the basic tenets upon which our
country was based is the clear distinction between church and
state.

My concern regarding the Oak Park schools stems from the
quality of education that has dropped from 30 years past. What
happened and why?

What I seek to do, if elected, is find out the cause and take any
measures in order to correct any concerns. I would love to see the
township and Oak Park become as one entity in lieu of these divi-
sions.

Somebody prayed for me. If not, I don't believe I would be who
I am today. If prayer is so terrible to exercise in schools, then I
need someone to tell me why are we having so much trouble
with our youngsters today. Since prayer has been taken out of
schools and the situation of our young adults has not improved,
maybe we need to look for another alternative. Yes. I would vote
for a voluntary moment of silence. Who knows, try it— you
may like it.

Key issue is finance. The state has been chipping away at the
OPSD's limited funds. The governor has made it no secret that
he wants to revamp the school code — plundering public edu-
cation into utter chaos. Charter schools will sap public educa-
tion of what little funding there presently is.

The local school districts in southern Oakland County have to
band together and speak with one voice when dealing with Lans-
ing. The OPSD should even consider litigation against Gov. Engler
to block the lunacy of his policies.

There is no place in public education for prayer— in any form.
Our history teaches all too well the outcome when the line be-
tween church and state even begins to be anything less than
well defined.

93

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