100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 02, 1995 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE: BUSINESS/ HOW'S THE JOB MARKET FOR GRADS?;
MITZVAH HEROES/ PEOPLE WHO MAKE THE DETROIT AREA BETTER.

75ยข

DETROIT

THE JEWISH NEWS

4

SIVAN 5755/JUNE 2, 1995

A School Is Born

Jay Kogan renews his gift to the Hillel Day School
community: $4 million to start a high school and
$1 million for an endowment.

JILL DAVIDSON SKLAR STAFF WRITER

A fter months of de- up where Hillel leaves off in

eighth grade. Another $1 mil-
lion will fund an endowment for
a kindergarten-through-eighth-
grade math, science and com-
puter curriculum.
"Before the end of this
decade, there will be a Hillel
High School," Mr. Schostak told
the crowd of nearly 800. 'Words
cannot express our gratitude.
We are filled with emotion and
pride."
Mr. Kogan originally pro-
posed a $5 million gift to Hillel
in December, with the stipu-
lation that the school move
from its present Middlebelt
Road and Northwestern
Highway location and construct
a new building. A site at the
Jewish Community Campus at
Maple and Drake roads was
targeted.
After months of study, debate
and some parental protest, the
school's board avoided a vote on
the issue, declaring instead that

Jay Kogan: Doing "what's right."

KOGAN page 20

PHOTO BY JEFF KOWAL SKY

bate Jay Kogan is
giving $5 million to
Jewish education.
At the Hillel Day
School annual din-
ner Tuesday night at Adat
Shalom Synagogue, Hillel
President Robert Schostak an-
nounced Mr. Kogan is planning
to contribute $4 million to start
a high school that would take

High Flier

A Bloomfield Hills resident is about to donate his
impressive collection of memorabilia to the Israel
Air Force Museum.

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM ASSOCIATE EDITOR

R

udy Newman didn't know
much about Zionism, but
he was ready to give his
life for it.
Rudy was a Wayne
University law school student
in January 1948 when the rab-
bi at the Hillel House asked him
to consider doing a little under-
cover work.
Jews in Palestine needed
arms, he said. Rudy would be
just the person to help. The na-
tive Detroiter had been a fight-
er pilot with the elite U.S. Naval
forces during World War II.
It didn't take long for Rudy to
make up his mind. School was

boring. Being a pilot was ro-
mantic.
"I didn't go because I was a
Zionist," Mr. Newman says. "I
went because I loved flying.
"But if you've ever been to
Israel, you know the feeling you
have when you first set foot
there. I tell you, the minute I
touched ground I felt like I was
at home. That's when I became
a Zionist."
Stacks of books and photo al-
bums, sll neatly organized and
categorized, are the devoted
guardians of Mr. Newman's
past. A man who helped bring

HIGH FUER page 8

CLOSE-UP

FASTEN YOUR SEATBELT

HERE'S ISRAEL IN THE 21sT CENTURY

LARRY DERFNER ISRAEL CORRESPONDENT
Story on page 40

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan