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February 24, 1995 - Image 117

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GREAT ACCELERATION.

H

SECRETS

• Agency •

JERRY FENBY
HOT ICE
SECRETS
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LOVING CUP
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The Volvo 850 GLT. Now with front wheel drive. The
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precisely a time when Egypt
could be demonstrating its clout
in the region by serving as a
facilitator in the peace process,
why has Mr. Mubarak chosen
to lock horns with Israel
rather than downplay their dif-
ferences?
One answer ascribes Egypt's
behavior to tactics. What might
appear to be Egypt's sudden
opposition to Israel's unique
nuclear status has actually been
a pillar of Egyptian policy.
Egypt's proposal to declare
the Middle East a nuclear-free
zone goes back to a draft of
the Camp David accords — from
which it was deleted at Ameri-
ca's and Israel's insistence.
Since the Madrid Conference,
the meetings of the arms-control
working group of the Multilat-
eral Talks have come nowhere
near seriously discussing nuclear
weapons. Thus the renewal of
the NPT is a golden opportunity
for Egypt to highlight Israel's
"unfair privileged status."
A more sophisticated expla-
nation points to a deep Arab am-
bivalence toward the peace
process or at least toward its pos-
sible results. In a striking piece
titled "The Arabs in Their Own
Eyes," Ze'ev Schiff, defense edi-
tor of the Israeli daily Ha'aretz,
noted that the Arab world per-
ceives itself as exceptionally di-
vided and weak at this time. In
light of that weakness, even the
high points of the peace process
— like the Casablanca Confer-
ence, which Israel organized with
such aplomb — have spawned
suspicions that what peace will
really mean is Israeli hegemony
in the region.
A fear of losing control of po-
litical developments — as Israel
wins over the Arab periphery
(the Gulf and North Africa) be-
fore making full concessions to
the confrontation states (Syria,
Lebanon and the Palestinians)
— has been heightened by the
specter of an Israeli economic
juggernaut. Add to that the de-
mand backed by the United
States that Israel be allowed to
retain its nuclear option (read
"military hegemony") and it's
easier to grasp why Egypt, the
self-styled leader of the Arab
world, has built up a store of re-
sentment and been venting it so
strongly of late.
The "hegemony theory," which
has become a buzz word in the
Israel media, only complicates
an excruciatingly complex situ-
ation. For it suggests that even
under the best of circumstances,
Israel can expect no more than
the aloof peace it has experienced
with Egypt with all its Arab
neighbors. And that, in turn, im-
plies that rather than adjust its
philosophy of deterrence to the
needs of an age of peace,
Jerusalem should cling to its "nu-
clear ambiguity" for as long as it
possibly can.

FENBY
STEIN
Entertainment

Tobyann Pollak

allied ASID

• Detroit Free
Press

• Eccentric

(810) 737-3387

117

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