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February 24, 1995 - Image 108

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MACCABI CLUB OF DETROIT
AND
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER

IMMENL

WHY RENT? page 107

announce

TRYOUTS FOR PARTICIPATION IN THE
1995 MACCABI YOUTH GAMES

HOUSTON AND LOS ANGELES:
AUGUST 11-170R 18, 1995

Boys and girls ages 12-16 (as of 8-1-95) are eligible

TRYOUT SCHEDULE

Boys Soccer
Girls Soccer
Boys Softball
Girls Softball
Swimming
Water Polo
Track/Field
Golf
Gymnastics
Racquetball
Volleyball
Girls Basketball
*Boys Basketball
Table Tennis
Boys and Girls Tennis

Sunday, February 26
5:00 P.M.
Sunday, February 26
5:00 P.M.
Sunday, February 26
6:30 PM.
Sunday, February 26
6:30 PM.
Thursday, March 2, Meeting Only
7:30 P.M.
Thursday, March 2, Meeting Only
7:30 P.M.
Thursday, March 2, Meeting Only
7:30 PM.
Thursday, March 2, Meeting Only
7:30 P.M.
Thursday, March 2, Meeting Only
7:30 PM.
Sunday, March 5
2:00 P.M.
Thursday, March 2 and 9
6:00 P.M.
Sunday, March 12 and 19
5:30 PM.
Sunday, March 12 and 19
6:00 PM.
Sunday, March 19
6:00 PM.
Sundays in March and April.
Call 683-2848 evenings
for entry form or pick one up at the physical education office
at either JCC building. In order to be eligible to compete,
entries must be received by 5:00 P.M. on 3/3/95.

There will be separate 12-14 and 15-16 year old boys basketball teams.

ALL TRYOUTS WILL BE AT THE MAPLE/DRAKE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
It will not be known which city individual teams will be going to at tryout time.
Individual sports will be competed separately for boys and girls in the following divisions:
GIRLS: 12-14; 15-16. BOYS: 12-14; 15-16.

For further information, call Alan Horowitz at 737-0639 evenings.

Canoeing • Riding

Kayaking • Tennis

Backpacking

Archery • Nature

Drama • Canoe Trips

Arts and Crafts

Since 1934 Arowhon has been known for intense teaching
of skills and "the best waterfront program in North America."
In the Algonquin Park wilderness boys and girls
aged 7-16 are nurtured and challenged.
Take advantage of the favorable Canadian $ exchange rate!

DETROIT INFORMATION SESSION:
Sunday, February 26 at 5:00 p.m.
Birmingham Community House

VISIT US AT CAMP FAIR
Sunday, February 26, 11 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
West Hills Middle School
at Lone Pine Rd., East of Middlebelt
Info.: 72 Lyndhurst Ave. Toronto, Ontario M5R 2Z7 Tel (416) 975 9060
Fax: (416) 975-0130

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la l

the Grosses, if something were to
break or need repair, Mr. Gold-
man has money set aside to fix it.
"It seems like we're always do-
ing some sort of project," said Mr.
Gross, whose next undertaking
will be putting new blinds on the
windows.
Mr. Katzen has done a few pro-
jects around the house too. Last
summer, his big undertaking was
building a deck.
While many young homeown-
ers feel renting is like throwing
out money, leasing a house or an
apartment may still be the best
option for some young adults. An-
drew Hayman, of the Hayman
Co., a Troy-based commercial real
estate business which specializes

"Finding and buying
a house are the
worst parts."

— David Goldman

in apartment management, dis-
cussed the benefits of renting.
"There are less worries in-
volved," said Mr. Hayman, a 20-
something apartment renter
himself. "As a renter, you're not
paying for any maintenance,
property taxes or insurance and
you can move when you want. An
apartment gives you flexibility
and you're not locked in for
years."
But, says Ms. Gross, one of the
best aspects of ownership is: "It's
mine. I can put holes in the walls
and no one cares." D

Ready To Buy A Home?

CAMP AR

Windsurfing • Sailing

percent down payment. Now, his
monthly mortgage payments are
$388, about half the amount he
would be spending on rent, he
said.
"I see renting as throwing
money out the window. It's not a
good financial decision. Most peo-
ple don't realize how little you
need to get into a house," said Mr.
Katzen, who enjoyed his experi-
ences in purchasing a house
enough to change careers and be-
come a real estate agent. "It's a
lot of responsibility, but it lets you
be independent at the same
time."
Mr. Goldman shares the re-
sponsibility with two roommates,
who each rent a room in his
house.
The trio share cutting the
grass, shoveling the snow and
taking out the garbage.
"The process of finding and
buying a house are the worst
parts," Mr. Goldman said. "It took
me between three and four
months. The best advice I can
give to someone looking to buy
a house is: be patient.
"There is nothing bad about
owning a house. The worst thing
I can think of is the neighbor's
dog, who occasionally eats our
garbage."
Even the upkeep and mainte-
nance don't bother Mr. Goldman.
Maybe it's because he was cov-
ered by a warranty for his first
year in the house or because the
most damage he has incurred
was a broken sump pump that
was covered, except for a $100 de-
ductible, by insurance.
However, like Mr. Katzen and

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starting at

$39.95

4 cyi.

Sick of writing a monthly rent
check or living at home? Pur-
chasing a home sounds over-
whelming, but young adult
homeowners promise the bene-
fits outweigh the costs.
During a recent home own-
ership workshop co-sponsored
by the Neighborhood Project,
the Michigan Group and First
Federal of Michigan, prospec-
tive buyers learned the step-by-
step process that should be
followed when buying a home.
These experts stress the im-
portance of following a set of
guidelines when purchasing a
new home.
Assessing your financial sit-
uation is an important first step.
You can start by comparing cur-
rent non-housing expenses like
food, clothing, car payments, en-
tertainment and debt payments
to your gross monthly income.
This will give you a good idea of
how much you have left for
housing related expenses.
Realtors from the Michigan
Group tell prospective buyers to

also think about ownership re-
sponsibilities and the possible
change in lifestyle they can face
as a homeowner.
Ask yourself how much you
want to spend on a home and
how much of a down payment
you can make.
Once that initial decision to
buy is made, look for an area
where you find the homes ap-
pealing and affordable.
Finding a trustworthy and
educated realtor is also impor-
tant. Once a realtor is found,
that person can help you
through the complex process of
making a purchase offer, mak-
ing a loan application, conduct-
ing a title search and closing the
deal. D

—J.F.

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