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February 10, 1995 - Image 102

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LINOCES TRUNK SHOW

at

and gallery

rioNTII OF FEBRUARY ALL urioas BOXES WILL BE

DURING TI IE

20% OFF

STOP IN TO SEE TI IIS CI IARMING COLLECTION OF
I IANDPAINTED PORCELAIN BOXES IMPORTED FROM FRANCE.
FEATURING A SPECIAL PREVIEW OF NEW DESIGNS FOR 1995 FROM ROCI IARD.

REMEMBER VALENTINE'S DAY IS FEBRUARY I4Th

Thurcloti 10:00-9:00
Sundou 12:00-5:00

Tie one on.

9th
Annual
Charity
Trade-In

All items

Join The Shirt Box
as we host our ninth
Annual Charity Trade-In.
Throughout the month of
February, anyone bringing
in used dress shirts or ties for
charity will receive $3 OFF* the
already low price of dress
shirts or ties, on a
one-for-one
basis.

collected during
February will go
to benefit
C.O.T.S. and
Friend's Alliance

v

American Heart Association

WERE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE

11111

NI NI II

. I

colt \iii‘,..\1*,(-

•Dresses
•Swimwear
•Blazers

has
arrived!

• Skirts
• Bomber Jackets
• Bridal Collection

A1= )_A-_ I\ %O

COLLECTION

268 W. MAPLE, B'HAM
644-9224

El NI III IN MI II

TRUNK
SHOW

• Dress Shirts
•Ties
• Sport Shirts

19011 West 10 Mile Road

(Between Southfield & Evergreen)

In the Orchard vall
West Bloomfield • (810) 737-4888

Saturday
March 4th
124 P.M.

Southfield

810-352-1080

STORE HOURS:
Daily 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

* PREVIOUS SALES AND SALE ITEMS EXCLUDED.

DAVID KLEIN

OFFER EXPIRES 3-3-95

A THE MCDONNELL HOVSE

ANTKIVES

02

B3 B3E8
EBB3Ef3 EBEB

• Sell
19$00 • E Vest 12 Mile ROA



lust c.Ast of Evcrsrcol:.

(S10) 559-9120 _1'

181•71.1

GAIL LICHTMAN SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

n the Ukrainian shtetl of
Zholldev, an elderly man is the
last Jew left. He's unwilling to
leave because "someone has to
look after the synagogue."
In Grodno, Belarus, a city
which before World War II had a
Jewish population of some 25,000
and boasted 40 synagogues, five
of the original pre-war residents
remain to recall the splendor of
the synagogues and Jewish com-
munity institutions.
And in Uzbekistan, Georgia,
Azerbaijan and Moldavia, hun-
dreds of years of Jewish history
are drawing to a close as whole
villages and communities leave
for Israel.
Since 1979, the Center of Jew-
ish Art (CJA) at the Hebrew Uni-
versity in Jerusalem, established
by art history Professor Bezalel
Narkiss, has been preserving
Jewish visual heritage through
the documentation of all extant
Jewish art — ritual objects, syn-
agogue architecture, Hebrew
illuminated manuscripts and
ancient and modern Jewish art.
The only institution of its kind
in the world, CJA's work is car-
ried out by history graduate stu-
dents under the supervision of
university staff. Of top priority is
the documentation of Jewish art
in "danger areas," where Jewish
communities are at risk of dis-
appearing. Since 1990, the cen-
ter has been engaged in extensive
efforts in Eastern Europe and the
former Soviet Union and has con-
ducted expeditions to Poland, the
Czech Republic, the Ukraine,
Lithuania, Belarus, Russia and
Uzbekistan. This summer, ex-
peditions are planned to the
Caucasus Mountain region,
Moldavia, the Ukraine and
Poland.
"At present, the political situ-
ation is extremely uncertain in
the Caucasus region and Mol-
davia," says Dr. Aliza Cohen-
Mushlin, CJA director and editor
of the center's annual magazine,
Jewish Art. "There are wars
going on and we hope to be able
to carry out these expeditions. By
next year I'm afraid there won't
be much left to document."
Documentation is entered into
a computerized database, the
Jerusalem Index of Jewish Art,
where it is accessible to students,
scholars, curators and collectors
around the world.
"We are a non-invasive form of
documentation," Ms. Cohen
Mushlin says. "We photograph,
draw, describe and measure
artifacts. We are not a museum

I

Tucsdou, Walkcsdou
Fridou, Soturdog 10:00-6:00

Located in he OrcIE1rd Moll
West Bloomfield
(810) 855-4466

Preserving Forgotten
Jewish Treasures

GALLERY

430 North Woodward
Birmingham MI 48009

Telephone 810.433.3700
Fax 810.433.3702

and we do not collect, transfer or
remove artifacts. But we do pass
on information to others to help
preserve what we have found."
On an expedition to Lithuania
in 1992, for example, researchers
discovered six wooden shtetl syn-
agogues.
"This was a most extraordi-
nary find," Ms. Cohen-Mushlin
says. "It was previously believed
that no wooden synagogues had
survived World War II. These
synagogues had not been in use
since the war but they were never
vandalized. They are being used
today as warehouses and cine-
mas and are in very poor condi-
tion."
The CJA notified a Lithuanian
open-air museum of wooden
churches about the synagogues,
in the hope it will be able to pre-
serve at least one of them as part
of its collection.
The discovery of the syna-
gogues and numerous other finds
in shtetls and museum store-
houses around the former Soviet
Union are the result of coopera-
tion between the CJA and the
Jewish University in St. Peters-
burg. Members of the Jewish
University have served as the
center's eyes and ears in the field,
and its people are instrumental
in arranging the expeditions to
the CIS and the Baltic states.
The CJA has conducted docu-
mentation training courses in
both St. Petersburg and Israel for
Eastern European scholars, cu-
rators and Jewish leaders. The
second two-week course on doc-
umentation, held recently in
Jerusalem, brought some 40 par-
ticipants from all over the former
Soviet Union, Poland and Hun-
gary. At the end of June 1994, a
course on Jewish art was given
in St. Petersburg with more than
100 participants.
The amount of Jewish art re-
maining in Eastern Europe and
the former Soviet Union is stag-
gering. In the Jewish Museum in
Prague alone, there are at least
32,000 artifacts. The items were
gathered by the Nazis from 132
different communities in Bo-
hemia and Moravia, with the
intention of creating "a museum
of the inferior race," according to
Yarona Pinhas, a master's stu-
dent in art history who recently
returned from a one-month
expedition to Prague.
"We worked in the same offices
the Nazis used. The artifacts
were meticulously numbered and
catalogued. Our aim was to con-
centrate on the metal ritual

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