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January 20, 1995 - Image 63

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Session I: June 26 — July 20
Session II: July 24 — August 17

• PRE-SCHOOL — 5TH GRADE

Campers grouped by age enjoy sports, nature

hikes, canoeing, swimming and much more.

• CAMPER'S CHOICE

By choosing one morning and one afternoon
activity, campers are able to custom design their
own summer of fun

• SAFARI & TEEN CARAVAN

Visit places of interest in the metro area and
experience a different adventure each day.

• CAMP OF THE ARTS

The camp for the young aspiring actor.

• SUMMER TRAVEL ADVENTURE

Visit exciting cities & see world class theatre!

-

• PRO SPORTS

Each week professional athletes teach the
fundamentals of football, basketball, soccer,
baseball, karate, or rollerblade hockey.

CALL TODAY, SPACE. IS LIMITED!

MAPLE/DRAKE (WEST BLOOMFIELD) 661-7605 OR JIMMY PRENT1S MORRIS BUILDING (OAK PARK) 967-4030

Day Camp, Inc.

BestStoimerEver/

• Grand Canyon in Arizona • San Francisco's Alcatraz

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FOR THE SUMMER OF A LIFETIME

TEENS 13-17 YEARS

I

ACTIVE
TEEN TOURS

• Combination Camping / Hotel / Dorm Tours.
• Western U.S.A., Canada and Europe.

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POND AND LAKE • ARTS AND CRAFTS • DANCE

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ATHLETICS • GYMNASTICS • PHOTOGRAPHY
NATURE PROGRAM • ANIMAL FARM • GO-KARTS
TENNIS • SWIMMING • FISHING • BOATING
SAILING • WATER SKIING • TUBING • COMPUTERS

CALL LORRAINE & ARNIE (810) 932-2123

OUTDOOR
ADVENTURES:

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• Ski, Raft, Rock Climb, Mountain Bike, Tennis ...
• No experience required!
• Canadian Rockies, Pacific Coast & Quebec.



STUDENTS 17 - 21 YEARS

ON TOUR:

• Cycling and Touring Europe or the Pacific Coast.
• Outdoor Adventures in Canadian Rockies or Europe.

CALL NOW FOR A FREE BROCHURE
MARK SEGAL, Director 1





• For 1st time beginners to intermediate.
• "Plus" ... much more than just cycling!
• Cape Cod, Vermont, Pacific Coast and Europe.

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bliLLOWAY

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watches over us and his messen-
gers let us know when we are do-
ing things right," said Mr.
Freedman.
Tanuga magic is seen at camp-
fires when Wakonda's messen-
ger comes to light the fire.
Sometimes there are special
lighting effects or an actual ap-
pearance by the Tanuga Eagle,
the messenger Watacha or a new-
er addition to mythology, Aqua
Man, the god of the water. "If
there is unity and harmony in the
camp, Wakonda will look upon
us favorably and the fire will
light," said Mr. Freedman.
Camper Jeffrey Shostack, 11,
of Franklin, looks forward to see-
ing the "Tale of the Tans and the
Ugas" re-enacted at the opening
campfire. A group of counselors
representing the Tan Tribe come
out of the water, while those play-
ing the part of the Uga Tribe
emerge from the forest. The Tans
and the Ugas stage a fake fight
with bows and arrows and hand-
to-hand combat until only one
Tan and one Uga remain. The
two survivors decide to join to-
gether and form Tanuga.
Jodie Shostack, 9, likes to tell
about the Tanuga Eagle that flies
over the camp. "It watches over
us and when someone does some-
thing good, the eagle drops a
feather," she explains. (Accord-
ing to Mr. Freedman, eagle sight-
ings are common. There are four
eagles with eight-foot wing spans
in the vicinity.)
Feathers from the Tanuga ea-
gle are given out at "Feather
Fires," the campfire ceremonies
that recognize achievements and
good deeds. Jodie, for example,
got a feather for physical fitness
achievement in the camp's Pump-
It-Up exercise program. But
there are other ways to earn a
feather besides athletic accom-
plishments, Mr. Freedman points
out. A camper who earns five
feathers receives the coveted ea-
gle medallion.
Another camp tradition, says
Jeffrey, is the expression "How-
How," which means "good job" or
"hooray." This form of applause
is chanted when someone re-
ceives an honor such as becom-
ing a circumnavigator for
swimming across the lake.
Activities may come and go as
certain sports fall in and out of
popularity. Changes in the camp-
scape occur as time and weath-
ering take their toll on buildings.
But the legends and lore passed
down to each new group of in-
coming campers bind the gener-
ations.
"The traditions are what make
camp more than just activities
and recreation," observes Mr.
Freedman. "Parents remember
the camp tradition. They ask if
we still have Wakonda.
"Yes," Mr. Freedman assures
them, "Wakonda is still watching
over the camp." I 11

Jewish Community Center Camps
have the perfect summer
experience for your child.

'800-767 -0227

• Glacier Skiine • Colorado White Water Raftin.

Give a little piece of your Heart

V GIVE TO THE TORCH DRIVE

03

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