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December 23, 1994 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-12-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Survivors Support
Prosecution Of Nazis

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onia Nothman is sure:
There are many former
Nazis living in the United
States.
A survivor of the Skarzysko
concentration camp in Poland,
Ms. Nothman said the idea that
former Nazis are here "hurts a
lot."
The U.S. government "let them
through" in the 1940s and '50s,
"but it took us (survivors) years
to get here."
Ms. Nothman and other local
survivors were reacting to the
news that the U.S.
Justice Depart-
ment is seeking to
remove the citi-
zenship of Ferdi-
nand Hammer of
Sterling Heights,
alleging he was a
concentration
camp guard dur-
ing World War II.
David Bur-
dowski, a survivor
of 12 concentra-
tion camps, in-
cluding Ausch-
witz, is convinced
of Mr. Hammer's
guilt. For him, "if David Burdowski
the OSI (Office of
Special Investigations) says he's
guilty, then he's guilty."
"The guy in Cleveland (John
Demjanjuk) — they say he wasn't
Ivan the Terrible, but he was in
the camps. It's too bad this guy is
in the United States. It's too bad
it took so long to bring him to jus-
tice."
Paula Marks Bolton was 13
when the Nazis invaded her na-
tive Poland in 1939. "I was
robbed of my childhood and my
family," she says.
And although it is
painful to always
remember, she
tells her story
weekly to school
and church
groups touring
the Holocaust
Memorial Center
in West Bloom-
"P#
field.
"I teach love
and kindness,"
she says. "We
have to let people
know. We have to
prevent the Holo-
caust from hap- Dr. Charles Silow
pening again by
teaching the young."
Ms. Marks Bolton believes
Nazis should continue to be pros-

ecuted, despite the passage of
time. "It would send the wrong
message," she says, if the prose-
cutions stopped. "Wherever they
are, they should be brought out.
They should not go completely
unpunished."
Martin Schlanger was 19
when he was sent to Auschwitz
in 1944. He lost his parents in the
Holocaust. He also feels strongly
about continuing prosecution.
He said age does not matter.
"These people committed the
most horrible crimes in the his-

Sonia Nothman
and a professional
perspective. Dr.
Silow is president
of CHAIM (Chil-
dren of Holocaust
Survivors Associ-
ation In Michigan)
and, as a psychol-
ogist, director of
Sinai Hospital's
Holocaust sur-
vivors program.
"We don't know
all the facts yet
(about Mr. Ham-
Paula Marks Bolton mer). We need to
look at the evidence.
But the question always becomes,
`Should we just forget?'
"I think that's wrong. This is a
nation that believes injustice and
the sacredness of human life. I
think the Justice Department
should be commended for con-
tinuing their investigations."
Dr. Silow says Holocaust sur-
vivors continue to feel anger "that
the murderers of their loved ones
are still at large, and that many
people don't want to hear their
stories or feel their pain."
There also is anger, he says,
Martin Schlanger
and a fear that people will forget
about the Holocaust. Cl
tory of civiliza-
tion. They should
Publicity
be extradited to
their native coun-
Deadlines
tries and prose-
The normal deadline for local
cuted." Mr.
news and publicity items is
Schlanger says
noon Thursday, eight days pri-
the United
or to issue date. The deadline
States used for-
for birth announcements is 10
mer Nazis in the
a.m. Monday, four days prior
Cold War against
to issue date; out-of-town obit-
the Russians af-
uaries, 10 a.m. Tuesday, three
ter World War II
days prior to issue date.
and allowed
All material must be type-
many Nazis to
written, double-spaced, on 8'/2
enter the United
x 11 paper and include the
States during the 1950s.
name and daytime telephone
Dr. Charles Silow looks at the
number of sender.
prosecutions from both a personal

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