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November 18, 1994 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

YOU ARE INVITED

WISH N

TO THE

that limiting Hamas funding
would inevitably affect other
groups.
Specifically, legislating against
Hamas would almost certainly
limit the ability of Irish Ameri-
cans to raise funds for groups
connected to the Irish Republi-
can Army — or for Jewish
groups to raise money for right-
wing extremists in Israel.
"We believe it is appropriate
to crack down hard on ALL ter-
rorist groups," said an official
with one Jewish organization,
"even those within our own com-
munity. But there is no doubt
that this is a factor that will com-
plicate the debate when Con-
gress gets back next year."

Exhibit Shows
World Change

It wasn't exactly planned that
way, but the current double ex-
hibition at the B'nai B'rith
Klutznik Museum in downtown.
Washington is yet another vivid
reflection of how the world is
changing in the wake of the
Arab-Israeli peace talks.
One exhibit focuses on "Jew-
ish Threads in the Moroccan
Muslim Carpet." The exhibit in-
cludes both Jewish and Muslim
sacred and ritual objects, as well
as everyday items characteristic
of both groups.
The second exhibit, running
simultaneously, includes the
work of a Jewish, a Christian
and a Muslim artist, who inter-
pret religious symbols through
their own unique perspective.
The display showing the ties be-
tween Jewish and Moroccan cul-
ture was conceived more than two
years ago—long before the recent
breakthroughs in the Middle East
peace process, and before the thaw
between Israel and Morocco.
"I didn't contrive this exhibi-
tion to be well timed, it just hap-
pened that way," said museum
director Ori Z. Soltes. "The reac-
tion has been overwhelmingly
positive; particularly given what
has happened in the past year
and a half in the Near East, this
is something people have been
very open to."
Mr. Soltes makes it clear that
this interface between art, his-
tory and today's events is exactly
what he intends for his museum,
which has won growing praise
since he took over in 1991.
"A museum which has at its
purpose to open peoples minds
should be in the forefront of this
kind of process of showing con-
nections," he said. "My obligation
as director of a Jewish museum
is that every exhibition and pro-
gram has to have a Jewish hook.
But I also think that those hooks
> can be connected to a whole range
of far-flung issues and ideas that
don't have to be conceived in nar-
rowly Jewish terms."

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER -
JEWISH NEWS
CHANUKAH PARTY AND ART
CONTEST RECEPTION

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1994
2:00 - 4:00 P.M.

FEATURING

* Family Chanukah Concert

with
Raquel Pomerantz Gershon

Raquel Pomerantz Gershon

ALSO

* Presentation of Jewish News Chanukah
Art Contest Awards
* Viewing of Art Contest entries
* Candle Lighting
* Refreshments

For Children, Parents and Grandparents

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
JIMMY PRENTIS MORRIS BUILDING

15110 W. 10 Mile Road • Oak Park

No Charge

For Additional Information, Please Call (810) 967-4030

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