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November 11, 1994 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ve never laughed so much nor
have I cried so much in one day,"
said . arc Beals of West Bloom-
field. The mere sight of El 747s
at the Detroit Metro Airport
international terminal brought
tears to our eyes and )ride to our
community, A year ririor the coif-
cept of a ithigan Mfrade Mission
was at most one El Al direct ilia t
servicing 200-400 etroiters.
pent-up demand resulted in some
1,300 Detroit Jewish communit
members occupying three El Al
Jets. w
T. 7 77,77; IJA mission
ever spo TH
NEWS use::
ties ch.
not toi.
.hotels
water a
days
to facii
in April

.

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ellfi Flews

Once a d;)lie:aus
symbol of Gur heritice

flgrf(ther,:,

inc:Inda assinmator,

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AFTERMATH

page 1

Howard Wolpe's concession
came early Tuesday night. Two
hours after the polls closed, he
addressed supporters gathered
at the Westin Hotel.
"Wolpe's campaign was a
wake-up call for the party,"
Democratic activist Zina Kramer
said. "The party has to become
more sensitive to the electorate.
I'm not sure if that means be-
coming more moderate. What it
means is re-examining the agen-
da and strengthening leadership
development within the party."
Despite the overwhelming
Republican success, some
Democrats went to sleep early
Wednesday morning, pleased
with their own '94 election results.
After months of uncertainty
and an evening of slow vote re-
turns, six-term Rep. Sander
Levin learned his constituents
agreed to send him back to
Washington as a member of what
will be an overwhelmingly
Republican 104th Congress.
Election day extended into the
early morning hours for the Royal
Oak congressman, his support-
ers and out-of-state family mem-
bers who gathered at a United
Automobile Workers union hall
in Madison Heights.
Vote totals from areas the con-
gressman expected to win, like
Oak Park, Huntington Woods
and Royal Oak Township, were
among the earliest figures to ar-
rive, keeping the atmosphere at
the UAW hall upbeat, though
with a nervous edge.
Throughout the evening, Sen.
Carl Levin talked to supporters
about a "strong gut feeling" that
his brother would emerge victo-
rious. Rep. Levin's early speech
was more cautious.
As the television sets, tuned to
each of the networks at the
UAW hall, began to indicate a
stronger than predicted nation-
al Republican trend, Sen. Levin
said he felt the results will change
the face of the Senate — but only
slightly.
Gilda Jacobs arrived at the
UAW hall after learning of her
own victory for a seat on the
Oakland County Board of
Commissioners.
"It went great," said the
Huntington Woods Democrat,
who not only felt her hometown
helped clinch the victory but was
surprised to learn she carried the
traditionally Republican city of
Pleasant Ridge.
"I campaigned there and did
not take it for granted that
Pleasant Ridge would not vote for
a Democrat. I also had the sup-
port of the city's mayor, which I
think helped me."
Other successful Democratic
bids mostly came from incum-
bents like Attorney General
Frank Kelly and Rep. David
Bonior, who beat Donald
Lobsinger in Macomb County.
State Reps. David Gubow of
Huntington Woods and Maxine

Berman of Southfield easily won
their contests. Oakland County
Commission candidates Nancy
Quarles and Lawrence Pernick
also won.
Democrat Gary Peters of
Pontiac was victorious in the
newly created 14th District state
Senate race.
On the Republican side,
Oakland County victors includ-
ed: U.S. Rep. Joe Knollenberg,
state Sen. David Honigman, state
Reps. Jan Dolan, Barbara Dobb
and John Jamian.
Victorious Oakland County
Commission Republican candi-
dates included: Shelley Goodman
Taub, Thomas Law, Donald
Jensen and David Moffitt.

Gordon Hassig campaigns for winning
Oakland County Commission candidate
Gilda Jacobs.

Incumbents were successful in
the judicial races. Oakland
County Circuit Court Judges
David Breck, Denise Langford
Morris, Francis X. O'Brien and
Edward Sosnick all won. In the
race for a new Oakland County
Circuit Court seat, Alice Gilbert
defeated Bryan Levy.
District Court Judges Susan
Moiseev and Gus Cifelli were vic-
torious.
Voter turnout, especially in
Oakland County, was higher
than usual. Oakland County
Republican Chair Mr. Alexander
said his party's concentrated get-
out-the-vote effort paid off, es-
pecially in Oakland County,
which recorded just under 55 per-
cent voter turnout.
"We sent out twice the litera-
ture and made twice the num-
ber of phone calls for this," Mr.
Alexander said. "I've never seen
more excitement at the grass-
roots level. There were times
when we had more volunteers
than we knew what to do with.
We had a receptive audience this
year who liked John Engler but
didn't like Bill Clinton.
"(The election results) are a
tremendous affirmation of John
Engler, who really in the last 10
days decided he was going to take
Spence under his wing and make
him a senator."

AFTERMATH page 10

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