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November 11, 1994 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WAIT IS OVER...

L UMINA

HERE

AFTERMATH page 8

Four-year-old Rebecca Gold
Jerome Magid was one of the
voters who turned out on election had her first civics course at
day. Like many, he said he was Burton. Her father, Richard,
fed up with the campaign nega- brought her to the polls and ex-
plained the importance of vot-
tivity.
"I was gravely disappointed ing and how it works.
If Rebecca had asked her fa-
at the lack of fairness among the
candidates," Mr. Magid said as ther which gubernatorial candi-
he waited to vote at Burton date he was voting for, Mr. Gold
Elementary School in would not have been able to an-
swer until after completing his
Huntington Woods.
As much as Mr. Magid, a pho- ballot. Minutes before entering
tographer, was bothered by what the booth, Mr. Gold had not made
he described as negative and un- up his mind.
"I'm not thrilled with the can-
fair campaigning, he described
the election as "a true and direct didates," he said. "I'm voting
democracy. I'm voting for a per- more on the propositions this
son; my vote does not go to an time." ❑
electoral college."

HILLEL page 1

Great Leasing Incentives
Just Announced!

Jack

Cauley

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JackPauley
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10

SOIWIE LAKE RD

IS MALE

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THE D ETROIT J EW IS H NEWS

Acc=rciiEvAsgLE-T

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Gee

OPEN SATURDAY 8:00-4:00

Orchard Lake Road Between 14 and 15 Mile
Hours: Mon. & Thurs. 8:30 am-9 pm
Tues. 8:00 am-6 pm
Wed., Fri. 8:30 am-6:00 pm

810-855-9700

Mr. Kogan requested the move
to the Maple/Drake campus be-
cause the location seems to en-
sure longevity for the school due
to the community's investment
in the area.
In addition, the board this
week will inform all parents by
letter, and call campaign con-
tributors to discuss the potential
contribution and its major con-
tingency.
At the same time, the Jewish
Federation of Metropolitan
Detroit and the United Jewish
Foundation are conducting a
joint study of the use of the land
on the West Bloomfield campus.
The first portion of the study,
breaking up the land tract
into future sites, has been com-
pleted. A committee to study and
assign purposes for each site has
convened and is expected to de-
liver results in three to six
months.
"The possibility of Hillel Day
School going to one of those sites
is part of what the committee is
considering," said Robert
Aronson, executive vice president
of the Jewish Federation of
Metropolitan Detroit.
"This is a campus which the
community owns. It is the jewel
in terms of land in the Jewish
community and the issue is
where the community will have
the greatest longevity," he said.
"We don't know if the site is
available," said Robert Schostak,
president of Hillel Day School.
"Nor are we saying that it is right
for Hillel."
As the committee and task
force study the potential move,
the school will continue its quest
to reach its fund-raising goal of
$11 million for the expansion of
the school and its endowment
fund.
The current expansion plans
call for a two-story, 28,000-
square-foot addition which will
include a chapel, classrooms and
a multi-purpose room. The en-
dowment fund would grow by $3
million to provide scholarships

for students and defray operat-
ing costs of a larger school.
Hillel's Generations Campaign
began in April 1993. Volunteers
were able to raise $6 million be-
fore announcing the campaign to
the greater community Oct. 9.
Groundbreaking on the ex-
pansion is still scheduled for June
1995 with an anticipated com-
pletion date of fall 1996.
"Our goal is to have 50 more
pledges by the end of the year,"
Mr. Schostak said. "We'll keep
meeting with our prospects."
Robert Schostak said the
school's committee will have to
grapple with the issue of mov-
ing the school to a new site when
the current site has been deemed
geographically central to the
Jewish community. The school
resides in Farmington Hills in
a neighborhood with a primarily
Jewish community, Mr. Schostak
said.
Mr. Schostak acknowledged
that the plan to move the school
may arouse concern from sup-
porters solicited for contributions
based on plans for expansion at
the current site.
However, he said contributors
were motivated by securing the
future of day-school education,
not just preserving the
Farmington Hills location.
"This is a community project,
a community effort to ensure the
future of quality Jewish educa-
tion in the Detroit community,"
Mr. Schostak said. "I don't think
the campaign is strongly location-
specific as it is education-specif-
ic."
A longtime supporter of Hillel,
Mr. Kogan has grandchildren
who attend the school and his
daughter, Lauren Liss, is a for-
mer board member. He has par-
ticipated in family functions
there and has been an annual
contributor to Hillel.
"He expressed his feeling that
he wanted to invest in Jewish ed-
ucation and he wants to see Hillel
Day School be the vehicle for his
investment," he said. ❑

4

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