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October 14, 1994 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

• 411111111111111111111•111111W

HOT
OFF
THE PRESS!

'20.62

retail 27.50

How Chewing On Ginger
Could Save Your Marriage

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM ASSOCIATE EDITOR

some rabbis because it gave the
appearance that the woman was
not covering her hair, by now it
has become the most common
hair covering.
Incidentally, shmattah is not
an appropriate term for the scarf
some Orthodox women use to
cover their hair. Shmattah refers
to an old rag and is a derogatory
term.

THRU
Oct. 14,
1994

AVROHOM PLOTNIK, President
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21770 W. 11 Mile Road • Southfield • Harvard Row • 356-6080

Q: Who was the first Jew to win a
Pulitzer Prize for music?
A: Aaron Copland, who in 1945

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A scene from the Yiddish film Tevye, produced
Schwartz.

Q: What sort of name is Tevye, as
in the main character in Fiddler on

the Roof?
A: "Tevye" is the Americanized
version of a Yiddish name ulti-
mately derived from the Hebrew
name Toviya. Russian Jews pro-
nounced it Tayvyeh, while Polish
Jews would have said Toivyeh. A
common Hebrew variant is Tu-
viya, and a common Yiddish vari-
ant is Tayvl.
Toviya is a biblical name found
in Zechariah 6:10, Ezra 2:60 and
Nehemiah 2:10.

in 1939 and staffing Maurice

that reflects the mature and
serious status that marriage
endows. Uncovered hair is more
appropriate to the frivolous
nature of girls. The Talmud re-
gards publicly uncovered hair of

won the prize for his ballet Ap-
palachian Spring.
Born in Brooklyn in 1900, Cop-
land was a composer, teacher and
conductor. For 25 years, begin-
ning in 1940, he served as head
of the Berkshire Music Center in
Tanglewood, N.J. He wrote sev-
eral books, including Music and
Imagination and What To Listen
for in Music.
Copland's other musical works
include Rodeo, Danzon Cubano,
Billy the Kid andPiano Quartet.
he died in 1990.

Q: Is actor Kevin Kline Jewish?
A: No. The St. Louis, Mo., na-

tive, who starred in Sophie's
Choice and The Big Chill, is the
son of a Jewish father and a gen-
tile mother. He was raised
Catholic and as a child attended
Catholic school, though today he
does not practice any religion.
Mr. Kline is married to actress
Phoebe Cates, with whom he ap-
pears in the new film Princess
Cariboo. Ms. Cates also is the
daughter of a Jewish father and
gentile mother. The couple have
a son, Owen.

Q: Why do Orthodox women cov-
er their hair?
A: The reason presumed by

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many — so as not to distract their
spouse from study, or not to ap-
pear attractive to men other than
their husbands — has no basis in
fact.
The Talmud requires married
women to cover their hair be-
cause of tzniut, chastity.
In biblical times, the uncover-
ing of a woman's hair was a form
of punishment and humiliation.
In the talmudic view, once a
woman is married she should
present herself in public in a way

Aaron Copland

a married woman as inappropri-
ate as an exposed part of the body
that decency requires to be
clothed.
Through the ages, women
have covered their hair in many
ways, with various types of veils,
shawls and scarves. From the
late Middle Ages to the early 20th
century, women in Eastern Eu-
rope wore a special bonnet called
a kupkeh. Some kupkehs were
plain, while others were deco-
rated with lace or even fur. Many
women, especially the poor, usu-
ally wore only a cloth or kerchief
(in Yiddish, tichel). Toward the
end of the 18th century, some
women began to cover their hair
with a wig (Yiddish, shaytl). Al-
though the wig was opposed by

Q: My spouse has bad breath and
I can't take it another minute. We've
tried every popular mouthwash, but
nothing works. Does Judaism have
any advice on this important matter?
A: Indeed it does, my long-suf-

fering friend. Indeed it does.
In fact, the Talmud, in tractate
Ketubbot 75a, mentions halitosis
as a possible cause of divorce.
Remedies suggested, in tractate
Shabbat 65a, include chewing
peppercorns, ginger and cinna-
mon.

Send questions to "Tell Me Why"
c I o The Jewish News, 27676
Franklin Rd., Southfield, MI
48034 or send fax to (810)
354-6069.

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