100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

October 07, 1994 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



HILLEL page 1

"(The consultant) over-designed.
Then we considered what was
economically feasible and phys-
ically possible and pared back the
design."
The plan that resulted will add
eight to 10 classrooms, a chapel
to seat 200, science and computer
laboratories and a half-gym to
the existing 70,000-square-foot
structure. The present roof will
be fixed and some of the rooms
updated. A 30-year-old heating
system is being replaced this fall
with some of the committed
funds.
Also, two parcels of land total-
ing five acres and located on
either side of the existing prop-
erty were purchased. The out-

door plans will add a hard court
play surface to the rear of the
building, a baseball diamond to
the west lawn and a soccer field
ringed by an asphalt track. Also,
a service drive will wrap around
the school to provide additional
parking for large events.
The expanded school will likely
require a small increase in
budget, Mr. Schostak said.
The 1994-95 budget is $4.1
million, an all-time high. How-
ever, Hillel administrators
anticipate recapturing costs in-
curred by no longer using the
hard-to-heat rented portable
classrooms as well as replacing
the old furnace in the main
school. ❑

Leaders Expect More
Federation Funding

JILL DAVIDSON SKLAR STAFF WRITER

A

Subscribe now and receive a FREE Jewish News T-Shirt!*

For years we've been covering this community, inside and out, with the latest news

from neighborhoods, schools and synagogues. We've kept you covered with fast break-

ing stories, entertaining features and insightful commentary about Jewish life from

across the nation, Israel and the world. All written by award-winning journalists and

reporters. And we've expanded our coverage of local sports and business with reporter

Steve Stein.

Now we have another way to keep you covered. With a Jewish News T-shirt. Yours

FREE with a new Jewish News subscription**. Give one to a friend, neighbor or rela-

tive. Or, give one to yourself. You can either give the T-shirt or keep it for yourself. Ei-

ther . way, you're covered with The Jewish News. Why not try us on for size?

THE JENAR41 NEWS

N

WW

THE DETROIT J EWISH N EWS

Yes, I'd like my own

8

r4W.S.'% Fm, A-

Ow'A Mw*M

❑ Please bill me.

year subscription to The Jewish News.

Name

Address

My Address

City

❑ I'd like to send a_ year subscription as a gift to:

❑ Payment enclosed.

My Name

I

Wgs m:mm MgM '§sWM WW1 gWw

Save 40% off the newsstand price. Receive 52 issues plus six issues of Style magazine for only $39.00 ($54 out-of-state).
ADDMONAL SAVINGS: TWO YEAR SUBSCRIPTION FOR $72.00 ($94 out-of-state)

A

State

Phone

Zip

**New subscnbers only

`While supplies last, please allow 3-4 weeks for delivery

City

Zip

Phone

Gift Card Message

L
Adults' Size:
Children's Sizes: S_
M
Send The T-Shirt To:
''fr For faster service call 810-354-6620 and charge It
[ 1 Gift Receipient
to your Visa or MasterCard between the hours of 8:30 am and 5:00 pm 1_1 Me
mmm MWKS MWA
mmm
WM ff00. nno ono
MMM vsawv

P lease send all payments along with this coupon to:
▪ The Jewish News, P.O. Box 2267, Southfield, MI 48037-2267. Allow 2-3 weeks for delivery.

State

_

XL
L _

AD0894

dministrative and board
leaders at Hillel Day
School say investment in-
come from a larger en-
dowment should not take the
place of funding from the Jewish
Federation of Metropolitan
Detroit and expect a larger allo-
cation in the future.
"The Federation needs to be
responsible for the people's
needs, and that includes day-
school education," said Dr. Mark
Smiley, headmaster of the
school.
However, Dr. Richard Krugel,
chairman of Federation's edu-
cation allocation and planning
division, said funding is based
on an annual review of each
school's needs. If the school be-
comes more self-sufficient
through the investment income,
Federation funding could be cut.
"If they showed a significant
endowment income that could
offset scholarship costs and
things like this and other schools
did not have that capability, they
may receive less," Dr. Krugel
said.
"There are no plans, no guar-
antees for any agencies to re-
ceive a funding increase," he
said. 'We intend to treat (Hillel)
as any educational institution
which means they will be sub-
ject to an annual review.
"The most wonderful thing
would be for them to become
self-sufficient," Dr. Krugel said.
Federation currently supplies
$340,000 or roughly 8 percent of
the school's $4.1 million budget.
Twelve percent of the revenues
are generated by fund-raising
offorts while the remainder
comes from tuition.
The Generations Campaign
is expected to raise $11 million
in contributions, $3 million of
which will augment the school's

Dr. Mark Smiley:
More funding?

current $1 million endowment.
It is anticipated that interest
from the endowment will match
or exceed the current Federation
funding level.
The remaining $8 million
from the campaign will go to-
ward expanding the school with
a 28,000-square-foot addition
at the rear of the school and up-
dating the existing facility.
The school will use the in-
vestment income to keep a lid on
future tuition, not to offset the
cost of operating a larger school
as was originally anticipated.
Robert Schostak, president of
Hillel Day School, said more ef-
ficient utilities for a larger school
will cost about the same as for
the current school as the updat-
ed system will run more effi-
ciently.
Mr. Schostak said Federation
funding is proof of Federation's
commitment to the future of the
Jewish community.
"Community leaders feel that
the continuity is achieved
through education," Mr. Schos-
tak said. "Day school is probably
the most successful vehicle." ❑

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan