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September 30, 1994 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

750

DETROIT

NEWTS

25 TISHREI 5755/SEPTEMBER 30, 1994

APN Turns A New Chapter In Detroit

They feel peace is in Israel's best interest.

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Tzaly Reshef

en Knoppow sees a battle for American
Jewish public opinion, and he wants to
be part of it.
The issue is Middle East peace.
Mr. Knoppow, a Southfield attorney, is
concerned that not enough American
Jews who support the peace process are
speaking out. Some in this country, he

fears, too easily equate "pm-Likud" with "pro-
Israel."
So Mr. Knoppow has joined with others
in the community to form a Detroit chap-
ter of Americans for Peace Now (APN), the
U.S. partner of Israel's Shalom Achshav,
Peace Now, movement.
At 8 p.m. Oct. 5 at Temple Emanu-El,
APN will hold its first event, a lecture fea-
turing Peace Now co-founder Tzaly Reshef.
There is no charge.
Despite the several extant dovish organi-
zations in the area, Mr. Knoppow is opti-
mistic that APN will attract many new
members — especially those in the commu-
nity who may have liberal leanings but have
shied away from groups like New Jewish
Agenda. The difference with APN, he says,
is a single word: Zionist.
"APN's focus is specifically Zionist," he
said.
It is "fundamentally different from New
Jewish Agenda," which attracts both Zionists
and non-Zionists, and from Labor Zionist Alliance,
whose platform is directly tied to that of Israel's
Labor Party.
"APN's concern is solely what is in the best inter-
est of Israel," he said. "And we feel peace is in Israel's
best interest."
Established in 1981, APN has American offices in

Marriage
And Judaism

How do Jewish values solidify the union
between husband and wife?

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

Story on page 48

APN page 8

Charter Schools Under Fire

A home school academy is asking the state to finance students,
including those who are learning about religion.

JENNIFER FINER STAFF WRITER

ena Berkowitz, 12, attended a American Civil liberties Union, who claim
local Lubavitch school until the academy is unconstitutional and as
her parents, residents of part of Council of Organizations and
Southfield, decided she should Others for Education About Parochiaid,
study at her own pace. They Inc. have gone to court to block public fund-
enrolled her in the Noah ing for the school.
The controversy began earlier this year
Webster Academy, a newly created char-
when legislators passed charter school leg-
ter school.
But now, Rena's new school has come islation enabling private citizens to create
under fire by groups like the Michigan their own, publicly funded schools sepa-
Jewish Conference, the Michigan rate from formal school districts.
The idea behind the
Education Association, the Michigan
Association of School Boards and the law was to create some

R

competition for local school districts and
give parents and students more educa-
tional choices. Some of these charter
schools stress arts; others stress a tradi-
tional education. Noah

Webster is a home schooling network, en-
abling parents to educate their children
at home. Currently, 1,850 students are en-
rolled in Noah Webster.
Throughout Michigan, several charter
schools have been established since the
act passed. Charter schools could receive
as much as $5,500 in public monies for the
education of each student.
ThiS new phenomenon, particularly
Noah Webster, has sparked dissent be-
cause opponents believe home schools are
private and not entitled to public funding.
The lawsuit also challenges the entire
charter school law as unconstitutional be-
cause it allows public money to be spent
without supervision by the state Board of
Education.
If Noah Webster is approved for state
funding, school organizers said the mon-
ey will fund a computer link-up between
students at home and the office of the

SCHOOLS page 10

ALTERNATIVES

Guess Who?

On The Blocks

Coming Home

Mr. Moms

Some fabled visitors
in the sukkah.

A new swim team
at the JCC.

Ruth Laredo's career
brings her to Detroit.

More fathers are
home with the kids.

Page 14

Page 64

Page 73

Page 87

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