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September 02, 1994 - Image 57

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-09-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r

weeks prior, the sorrow was here in our own neigh-
borhood as scores of Soviet emigres were forced
from their Northgate Apartments into the cold
and snow during a fire.
In Ann Arbor the next month, a building on Hill
Street would be bought by Machon L'Torah of Oak
Park for outreach and a place to call home on
campus. Around the same time, Temple Israel
announced plans for what many believe is a first,
a mikvah at a Reform Temple. B'nai David
announced plans to vacate its shul by May 31.
Shir Shalom announced plans to break ground
for a new temple building on Orchard Lake and

Again, a fitting wrap-up.
5754 started with a
peace accord and
concluded with one.

Walnut Lake roads in late August. Rabbi Martin
Berman turned in his resignation at Southfield's
Congregation Beth Achim. Carol Rosenberg was
named administrator at the Fleischman Resi-
dence, Jeannie Weiner stepped down after her
term as president of the Jewish Community Coun-
cil, Alan Zemol was elected to take her place. For-
mer Council President Paul D. Borman was
named a federal judge. Around town in early
spring, Detroit's Anti-Defamation League hosted
a visit by several Israelis with Ethiopian heritage.
The high school students spent time with Young
Israel of Southfield families, but the key to their
visit was speeches and meetings they had with
black public high school peers in the suburbs and
Detroit.
An outpouring of local grief was expressed for
the June death of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. Sev-
eral local rabbis and followers of the Rebbe made
the trip to New York to attend his funeral.
Federation held its annual Days of Decision
campaign, raising some $1.2 million.
In July, Kosin's, a clothing landmark in Lath-
rup Village, announced that it would close its
doors.
Almost as if to wrap up the year, Detroit's own
Joel Tauber was one of several UJA officials to
meet with the leaders of Jordan around the time
of the peace signing between Israel and Jordan.
Again, a fitting wrap-up. 5754 started with a
peace accord and concluded with one.
But then there was Kerimova Khasiba, an el-
derly Soviet emigre raking mulch chips at the
Weinberg Biblical Park. Peace talks between high-
powered national leaders involved in world poli-
tics wasn't so interesting this day. Detroit is where
she was glad to be.
Mr. Zalman Epsteyn, who
lost his home to the fire at
Raking mulch chips on
Northgate Apartments,
a
beautiful
day for a good
awaits help from the Red
cause.
Cross. August 26, 1994
This was peace.



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57

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