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August 26, 1994 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-08-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Inside : Changing Times In The Legal Profession / No Stereotypes In Nursing

75¢

DETROIT

THE JEWISH NEWS

19 ELUL 5754/AUGUST 26, 1994

Applied Knowledge

After returning from CAJE,
educators are ready to set
new ideas into motion.

JENNIFER FINER STAFF WRITER

he nearly 80 local educators who attended last
week's Coalition for the Advancement of Jewish
Education (CAJE).conference will put their new
ideas into action next week as students through-
out metro Detroit return to Jewish day schools
and education programs.
Detroit participants — from early childhood teachers
to adult educators — said they are excited to bring what
they learned at CAJE to the classroom.
"Attending the conference gives you a real opportu-
nity to grow Jewishly and to find out what other edu-
cators are doing which transmits through what we do,"
said Sue Stettner, the director of Jewish Experiences for
Families.
Those who did not attend can still benefit from the
conference; the Agency for Jewish Education will in-
corporate material from some of the nation's top edu-
cators into upcoming programming.
"We made a point of spreading our staff all around,"
said Howard Gelberd, ME executive director. "I met
with directors from central agencies from around the
country and kept up with what's happening with vari-
ous pilot programs.
"The staff was scouting, looking to bring new ideas

Detroit Maccabi track stars Jenny Adelson and Chad DeWolf.

Maccabi Games
Returning To
Detroit? Maybe.

STEVE STEIN STAFF WRITER

Marjie Benson and Anat Bross
decide which workshops to
attend.

and guest speakers in. We
don't have a local Jewish in-
stitution of higher learning,
so our staff needs to be cur-
rent on what the trends and
who the experts are from
around the country. We
picked up a lot as a staff that
will trickle down to the class-
room."
Shawn Locke, director of
school services with the ME,
participated in workshops on prayer, music and current
issues in Jewish education. Much of what she and oth-
er AJE participants learned will be incorporated into
NIRIM, a year-long professional enrichment program
for local Jewish educators.
"Attending the conference was a community-building

ow that the 1994
Jewish Community
Centers North
American Maccabi
Youth Games in
Cleveland are history,
it's time to take a look
at the future.
A record five sites have been
named to host regional
Maccabi Games in 1995. They
are Central Florida, Greater
Columbus (Ohio), Houston,
Long Island and Los Angeles.
The 1996 North American
Games will be held at two lo-
cations: Metro West (N.J.) and
St. Louis. This will be the first
time since Maccabi youth com-
petition began in 1982 that the
increasingly popular North
American Games will be
staged at more than one site.
No decisions have been
made beyond 1996, although
Detroit is a possible venue for
the 1998 North American
Games. Detroit hosted the
1984 and 1990 North
American Games.

experience for our own teachers," Ms. Locke said. "We
hope to continue this experience in the NIRIM program."
During a NIRIM professional educators conference,
slated to take place on Oct. 30, attention will be given to
studying Jewish text.

Here are some vignettes
from the 1994 North American
Games:
SECURITY was tight
throughout the six-day event,
especially at the opening and
closing ceremonies in down-
town Cleveland. Veteran
Maccabi participants said they
had never seen such a notice-
able presence.
Uniformed policemen from
area communities patrolled in-
side and outside sports sites
and a helicopter flew overhead.
There were policemen on the
roof of the Mandel JCC in
Beachwood, where thousands
of athletes, coaches, officials,
parents and host families gath-
ered each day.
Mandel also was where ath-
letes boarded buses for daytime
competition and nighttime
trips to the Geauga Lake
Amusement Park, Sea World
and the closing ceremonies at
the Nautica outdoor am-
phitheater.

MACCABI page 108

[II lose Up

KNOWLEDGE page 8

Haunted America

From the spirit of a North
Carolina man killed in a
mine to the poltergeist
ofHoudini, Jewish
apparitions make their
appearances throughout
the country.

Story on page 60

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