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August 12, 1994 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-08-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE ONLY THING WORSE
THAN NOT VISITING YOUR VOLVO DEALER
WILL BE LEARNING WHAT YOU MISSED.

VOLVO VALUE FINANCING.

There hasn't been a better time to test drive a 1994

()APR*

24 Months
40% Down Payment

900 Series Volvo since. well, there have been 1994

900 Series Volvos. • These sedans and wagons feature. among other things, the

generous financing option listed above. as well as additional financing options

including 3.9% APR"" with no down payment. • These Volvos also come with — as you

probably guessed — numerous advanced safety features and a host of creature

comforts. • What they don't come with is a lot of time to take advantage of this

opportunity.

Don't miss it.

VOLVO

Drive safely.

Michigan's #1 Volvo Dealer

DWYER

ANDsONS

624-0400

Maple Rd. West of Haggerty

FINAL CLEARANCE ON ALL '94s IN STOCK
INCLUDING 850s

Offered by Volvo Car Finance, Inc. through DWYER and SONS VOLVO through August 31, 1994. Subject to credit approval and availability from existing dealer inventory. Delivery by
September 7, 1994 required. Dealer prices will vary and affect customer cost. Down payment may be comprised of dealer and/or customer contribution, as well as trade-in allowance.
*A 24 month finance contract for a new 1994 945T, with a MSRP of $25,660 (includes destination charge) and an Annual Percentage Rate (APR) of 0%, requires 24 payments of $641.50
per month with a dealer/customer contribution of $10,264. **A 36 month finance contract with an Annual Percentage Rate (APR) of 3.9% requires 36 payments of $756.44 per
month with no down payment. Different options, down payment, and/or term may affect the APR and monthly payment. Insurance, taxes, title and registration fees extra. See your
participating authorized Volvo dealer for details. ©1994 Volvo Car Finance, Inc. Drive Safely is a trademark of Volvo Cars of North America, Inc.

(/)

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42

The naming of America's new ambassador to Israel
reflects the Clinton administration's pro-Israel
sentiments.

JAMES D. BESSER WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT

A

s recently as 1978, Jews —
professional diplomats,
secretaries and
groundskeepers alike —
were unofficially banned from
serving at the American embassy
in Tel Aviv because of concerns
about "dual loyalty."
Now, a longtime Jewish ac-
tivist and former director of a
think tank associated with the
pro-Israel lobby is about to get
the nod as America's ambassador
to Israel.
During his Middle East swing
this week, Secretary of State
Warren Christopher confirmed
that Martin Indyk, currently se-
nior director. for Middle East af-
fairs at the National Security
Council and special assistant to
the president, will be nominated
to replace Edward P. Djerejian,
Who is retiring to head up the
James A. Baker III Institute for
Public Policy at Rice Universi-
tY.
Before his NSC appointment,
the Australian-born Mr. Indyk
served as director of the Wash-
ington Institute for Near East
Policy, a Middle East think tank
created by officers of the Ameri-
can Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee. Before that, he was
AIPAC's deputy research direc-
tor.
During his tenure at the Clin-
ton White House, Mr. Indyk was
a key player in administration ef-
forts to boost the Mideast peace

process. He also has pushed for a
tougher approach to the spread
of Islamic fundamentalism — a
focus that should further endear
him to the Israeli government.
What does it all mean?
"On the surface, it's one more
example of an administration
that has leaned over backward to
be friendly to Israel," said Robert
0. Freedman, a professor of po-
litical science at Baltimore He-
brew University and a leading
Middle East expert. "It's part of
a series of pro-Israel actions by
this administration. This is the
latest and the greatest."
Mr. Freedman discounted
speculation that the appointment
of an overtly pro-Israel activist
pointed to a new administration
effort to pressure Israel.
"That's the suspicious inter-
pretation," he said. "If you were
getting ready to squeeze Israel,
who would be better than some-
body like Indyk? However, this
administration has been so pro-
Israel in everything it's done that
it strains the credulity to think
this is part of their motivation."
Other observers suggest that
while Mr. Indyk's pro-Israel are
unimpeachable, his skills as a
diplomat are untested.
And there are concerns that he
will be hard to replace at NSC,
where he has brought a strong
pro-Israel voice into the decision-
making process.

Profile: Padan's Job
Is Labor Of Love

Enrollment
is off and running
at your new str,
neighborhood
KinderCare.

I

LLI

C/)

Indyk Gets Nod

There's a new state-of-the-art KinderCare Learning
Center in your neighborhood, with a N,vonclerful
program for children of all ages – from infants through
12-year-olds. We call it Whole Child Development.
Its a nurturing environment for your child's social,

qualified teachers care about your child and
build on your child care beliefs and values.
Enroll your child today – for a happier
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physiccd, motioned (Ind iniClICOLIdi growth. Where

The Whole Child is the Whole Idea.`'

OPENING AUGUST 29!

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Call (810) 471-9220, ext. 234 to pre-register
©1994 KinderCare Learning Centers, Inc

KinderCare

t is part of the conventional
wisdom of the 1990s that or-
ganized labor in this country
is on its last legs.
But to the Israeli government
— a Labor party government, af-
ter all — a strong connection be-
tween the American and Israeli
labor movements is a key ingre-
dient in the "special relationship"
between Washington and
Jerusalem.
Strengthening those bonds is
the job of Ceremia Padan, coun-
selor for labor at the Israeli Em-
bassy in Washington.
"Governments change, but so-
cial structures change much more
slowly," she said in a recent in-
terview. "We've had very good re-
lations with the unions that go

back even before the establish-
ment of Israel. We have delega-
tions going back and forth,
learning from each other."
Through her work with unions,
she said, she helps create more
personal bonds between Ameri-
cans and Israelis by focusing on
common issues — civil rights, the
rights of workers and programs
to help workers cope with a
changing world.
Those issues were the focus of
a speech she gave in June to a
major African-American labor
group — their first meeting with
an Israeli official.
She also works with federal au-
thorities to improve the lives of
workers in both countries.

PROFILE page 44

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