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April 29, 1994 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SINAI HOSPITAL

LEARN THE ART OF YOGA AND RELAXATION

Art Therapy At
Jerusalem Elwyn

As part of Sinai's comprehensive approach to cancer care,
Sinai Hospital is offering a FREE six-week course
in yoga and relaxation for people with cancer
through the Hank Greenberg Oncology Fund.

Our individualized program helps participants
to deal more effectively with cancer through
exercise, coping techniques and shared experiences.

All classes are conducted by a
certified yoga instructor who is also
a breast cancer survivor.

Classes will be held
Tuesdays, beginning May 24, 1994
7 - 8:30 p.m.

JUDITH SUDILOVSKY SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

I

n her soul Ayala is an artist;
in her thoughts she's a poet.
"When I'm weaving I feel like
I'm blossoming inside," she
says softly.
Like other artists, Ayala wants
people to enjoy her work, and she
also wants to be able to make a
living from her weaving. Unlike
other artists, however, Ayala is
mentally retarded. For four years
she has worked at the Millie
Shime Center of Jerusalem El-
wyn, where, along with seven
other clients of the center, she
weaves scarves and rugs using a
complicated weaving loom.

mainly because of their ability to
work the loom, which requires
hand and foot coordination.
The use of art — not only as
work but also as therapy and as
an enrichment activity — serves
an important function at
Jerusalem Elwyn.
"It's part of the concept of in-
dividuality," says Avi Ramot, di-
rector of Jerusalem Elwyn. "If a
person has artistic talent, and art
is one of the things he loves, we
give him a chance to do it."
For many of the clients at
Jerusalem Elwyn, art is the one
part of their lives over which they

at the
Jewish Community Center
6600 West Maple Road
(at Drake Road)
West Bloomfield

Please join us for this informative and valuable course.
We look forward to meeting you.

■ ■ ■

Reservations are requested as space is limited.
Call Linda Diaz, ACSW, Coordinator of Oncology Counseling at
(313) 493-6507.

T.J. MARBLE
HONE HEALTH CARE
WITHOUT THE HEADACHES. RESTORATION

t's amazing the way some home health care companies
provide services. You'd think they were the patient the way
they look out for themselves. With MA One Care you get
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the most appropriate;'quality care for the most important per-
son of all...the patient. AAA One Care. It's giving people all over
the Metropolitan lYi-County area plenty to feel good about.

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Services Provided:
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For More Information Call 810-354-6077 or 1-800-291-0090

50

"Bring your Marble
back to life"

call for an estimate

313-356-6430

VALERIE TAYLOR

FASHION RESALE

Exclusively Women's Clothing
and Accessories
Current Fashens Sizes 2-14

1844 W. Woodward
Birmingham

1 block North or 14 Mile Rd.

540-9548

"We Pay Cash for Fine
Clothing and
Accessories'

HOURS:
Mon.-Sat. 12-6

Artwork made in Jerusalem Elwyn's programs was exhibited and sold.

Their products are sold at the
center and some stores. Each
artist receives a base salary plus
a commission when one of his or
her pieces is sold. Jerusalem El-
wyn hopes that eventually its
clients will be able to make a liv-
ing solely from the sale of their
work, but until now the salaries
have had to be subsidized.
The Philadelphia-based Amer-
ican Elwyn Association, which
has been dealing with the men-
tally and physically disabled in
the United States since 1852, es-
tablished Jerusalem Elwyn by
Israeli request almost 10 years
ago. Jerusalem Elwyn now
serves more than 710 clients
from infants through adults in
their numerous programs
throughout the city. Programs
include special education, an
adult development center, shel-
tered workshops, supported em-
ployment, vocational training,
preschool programs, family coun-
seling and outpatient diagnostic
services.
Some people in the weaving
workshop, such as Ayala and an-
other 35-year-old woman, are
true artists who do embroidery
and other crafts on their own at
home, said Margalit Piller, the
coordinator of rehabilitation ser-
vices at Millie Shime. But most
of the clients are in the workshop

have total control. They can
choose the colors they use, where
to put the paint, the size and
shape of the sculpture they make
and they can simply choose to
work or not to work at any given
time.
For many of the Jerusalem El-
wyn clients who can't express
themselves verbally, sessions
with an art therapist provide the
outlet with which to communi-
cate their problems — regardless
of their artistic ability. The art
therapy sessions often prove to
be a catharsis for the clients, who
are able to reveal past events or
current problems to therapists
through their artwork.
Mr. Ramot takes the role art
can play in the lives of Jerusalem
Elwyn's clients seriously. Hang-
ing on a wall in front of his desk
is a portrait drawn by a mental-
ly disturbed woman. The woman
in the painting seems just about
to let out a horrific scream. The
colors are dark and the brush
strokes are harsh.
But Mr. Ramot sees beauty in
the picture. It is the first picture
the woman drew which did not
depict skeletons and graveyards.
She gave it to him.
"When I see this drawing I re-
member what a painting can re-
veal and what art can do for a
person," he said. LI

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