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April 22, 1994 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CULTURE page 33

ing individually, some as school
outings.
"'Me first objective is to bring
in things that Loren would have
enjoyed," Mr. Fischer said.
"But we're also hoping to give
families an opportunity to see
things they might not other-
wise. This age group is so im-
portant."
From Minsk To Pinsk, Yid-
dish folk tales performed by A
Wild Swan Theater, wraps up
the 1993-94 series on May 1 at
1 p.m. Russian folk dancing in
The Firebird and the Russian
story My House Is Too Small,
were performed earlier this
year.

Although the three perfor-
mances have a Jewish slant this
year, it is not a prerequisite for
concert consideration. Associa-
tions aren't forced, but moments
— such as when a Jewish com-
poser spoke to the children of
his earliest musical memories
in the synagogue — are re-
membered.
"We make the connections
when we can. But I believe ex-
posing children to art can be
seen as an intrinsically Jewish •
value," said Cantor Gail
Hirschenfang.
"We all would like to see the
temple as more of a living,
breathing cultural center." 0

Fair Explores Attitudes,
Campus Anti-Semitism

LESLEY PEARL STAFF WRITER

Ad deadline: May
Issue date: Week of Ma

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34

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For additional information or Wee: ,
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Sonya Kieerekoper and her mother Robyn learn about Northwestern University.

avi Ellis can't decide —
Brandeis or the Univer-
sity of Michigan?
Both universities have
accepted the North Farmington
High School senior for the 1994-
95 school year, but she needs to
know more about each campus'
Hillel Student Center and avail-
ability of kosher meals.
She asked Ken Levin a few
questions about his alma mater,
located just outside of Boston,
and circulated around Shiffman
Hall at the Maple/Drake Jew-
ish Community Center, picking
up pamphlets and brochures.
College recruiters and repre-
sentatives from 17 institutions
discussed social, political and
religious opportunities during
this week's Jewish College Fair,
sponsored by the Jewish Com-
munity Council and co-spon-
sored by a variety of youth
organizations. Students asked
a lot about grade-point aver-
ages. Parents carried armloads
of information.
Davi didn't make any deci-
sions Monday night. Most stu-
dents didn't.
Instead, close to 200 high-
school sophomores, juniors and

D

seniors learned a bit about
schools in and outside of the
state, Jewish opportunities on
campuses, anti-Semitism and
interfaith dating.
By attending the program,
students also were eligible to
win a $500 scholarship.
"There's definitely more kids
here than I expected," said
Wendy Sadler, a volunteer who
facilitated group discussions. "It
shows these students are look-
ing to make Jewish connections
at their schools of choice. I'm en-
couraged. College is typically a
time when we lose a lot of kids."
University of Michigan in-
teractive-theater group Talk To
Us took the stage around 7:30.
Skin color, religion, bigotry and
the danger of words were ex-
plored in performances.
Break-out groups discussed
generalizations, stereotypes and
possible solutions while munch-
ing on ice cream bars.
"I don't know if I need help
thinking about interfaith dat-
ing, but anti-Semitism is some-
thing I'm bound to run into
wherever I go," E " 7'1
a 10th-grader au ..
Western High School. 0

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